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Mr. Poe’s Indians: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket and Edgar Allan Poe as a Southern Writer

Mr. Poe’s Indians: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket and Edgar Allan Poe as a... Mr. Poe's Indians The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket and Edgar Allan Poe as a Southern Writer jace weaver Early in Mat Johnson's recent novel Pym, the book's narrator, a black college professor, states, "If we can identify how the pathology of Whiteness was constructed, then we can learn how to dismantle it." The professor's main subject of study is Edgar Allan Poe's only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. As novelist Adam Mansbach writes in his review in the New York Times, "It's as good a place as any to begin. Toni Morrison has written that `no early American writer is more important to the concept of American Africanism than Poe,' and his single work of long fiction is a simmering trove of racial terror."1 "Horrors from the pit of the antebellum subconscious," Johnson's narrator calls it. Most American readers today, if they know anything about Edgar Allan Poe's life, think of him as a man born in Boston, who lived and worked in New York and Baltimore and wrote macabre poems and short stories. Yet he was raised in Virginia, spent much of his life there, and never considered himself anything http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native South University of Nebraska Press

Mr. Poe’s Indians: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket and Edgar Allan Poe as a Southern Writer

Native South , Volume 5 (1) – Aug 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4025
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Abstract

Mr. Poe's Indians The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket and Edgar Allan Poe as a Southern Writer jace weaver Early in Mat Johnson's recent novel Pym, the book's narrator, a black college professor, states, "If we can identify how the pathology of Whiteness was constructed, then we can learn how to dismantle it." The professor's main subject of study is Edgar Allan Poe's only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. As novelist Adam Mansbach writes in his review in the New York Times, "It's as good a place as any to begin. Toni Morrison has written that `no early American writer is more important to the concept of American Africanism than Poe,' and his single work of long fiction is a simmering trove of racial terror."1 "Horrors from the pit of the antebellum subconscious," Johnson's narrator calls it. Most American readers today, if they know anything about Edgar Allan Poe's life, think of him as a man born in Boston, who lived and worked in New York and Baltimore and wrote macabre poems and short stories. Yet he was raised in Virginia, spent much of his life there, and never considered himself anything

Journal

Native SouthUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 19, 2012

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