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Modal Subjectivities: Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal (review)

Modal Subjectivities: Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal (review) Modal Subjectivities: Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal. By Susan McClary. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. 386 pp. MELANIE L. MARSHALL Susan McClary used to be a name that struck terror into the hearts of "traditional" musicologists: an unabashed feminist with what was received as a horrifying new approach to musicology that offered critical interpretations relating to gender and sex (the classification and the act) of classics as well as pop music. Bashed by the "traditionalists," Feminine Endings received a good deal of feminist criticism too (notably from Paula Higgins).1 With Modal Subjectivities, the prodigal daughter has returned to her first musicological home, modal theory.2 Who would have thought that thirty years after her controversial debut at the American Musicological Society annual meeting and almost fifteen after Feminine Endings McClary would receive a prize from the establishment itself in the form of the AMS's Otto Kinkeldey Award? This award says a lot about how musicology has changed. During the past decade or so, papers drawing on feminism, gender, sexuality, and queer theory have appeared more frequently at AMS conferences, and the critical musicology project that insists music has meaning has been increasingly accepted, although it is apparently only http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

Modal Subjectivities: Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612
Publisher site
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Abstract

Modal Subjectivities: Self-Fashioning in the Italian Madrigal. By Susan McClary. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. 386 pp. MELANIE L. MARSHALL Susan McClary used to be a name that struck terror into the hearts of "traditional" musicologists: an unabashed feminist with what was received as a horrifying new approach to musicology that offered critical interpretations relating to gender and sex (the classification and the act) of classics as well as pop music. Bashed by the "traditionalists," Feminine Endings received a good deal of feminist criticism too (notably from Paula Higgins).1 With Modal Subjectivities, the prodigal daughter has returned to her first musicological home, modal theory.2 Who would have thought that thirty years after her controversial debut at the American Musicological Society annual meeting and almost fifteen after Feminine Endings McClary would receive a prize from the establishment itself in the form of the AMS's Otto Kinkeldey Award? This award says a lot about how musicology has changed. During the past decade or so, papers drawing on feminism, gender, sexuality, and queer theory have appeared more frequently at AMS conferences, and the critical musicology project that insists music has meaning has been increasingly accepted, although it is apparently only

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 30, 2007

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