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Michel Tournier and the Metaphor of Fiction (review)

Michel Tournier and the Metaphor of Fiction (review) Reviews / 155 reader-response criticism to ask what happens when real, not ideal, readers confront the text with their "irreducibly other" perspectives. The nature and importance of the reader's contribution to the texts helps explain Sarraute's progressive abandonment of the ideal reader. Although the text's temporal priority might seem to privilege it over the complex process of the reader's interpretation, in the struggle for the control of meaning, O'Beirne concludes that it would be foolish to declare a winner. Throughout her study, O'Beirne again and again makes the point that all human existence is inherently dialogical: author, reader, and text are created by and interact through language. Inscribed in the Symbolic Order, none can escape the conventions of public language. Yet even though failure is thus inevitable, Sarraute refuses to abandon her Sisyphean task of attempting to find an authentic language to express the truth of the self. In Ici (1995), the internal self has completely withdrawn from intersubjective dialogue, even to the point of abandoning the tropism. O'Beirne's concluding chapter shows how the unremitting battle for authenticity in the struggle between living and dead language that is the subject of Nathalie Sarraute's previous works is replaced in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

Michel Tournier and the Metaphor of Fiction (review)

French Forum , Volume 27 (2) – Feb 13, 2002

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews / 155 reader-response criticism to ask what happens when real, not ideal, readers confront the text with their "irreducibly other" perspectives. The nature and importance of the reader's contribution to the texts helps explain Sarraute's progressive abandonment of the ideal reader. Although the text's temporal priority might seem to privilege it over the complex process of the reader's interpretation, in the struggle for the control of meaning, O'Beirne concludes that it would be foolish to declare a winner. Throughout her study, O'Beirne again and again makes the point that all human existence is inherently dialogical: author, reader, and text are created by and interact through language. Inscribed in the Symbolic Order, none can escape the conventions of public language. Yet even though failure is thus inevitable, Sarraute refuses to abandon her Sisyphean task of attempting to find an authentic language to express the truth of the self. In Ici (1995), the internal self has completely withdrawn from intersubjective dialogue, even to the point of abandoning the tropism. O'Beirne's concluding chapter shows how the unremitting battle for authenticity in the struggle between living and dead language that is the subject of Nathalie Sarraute's previous works is replaced in

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 13, 2002

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