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Materiality and Collective Experience: Sewing as Artistic Practice in Works by Marie Watt, Nadia Myre, and Bonnie Devine

Materiality and Collective Experience: Sewing as Artistic Practice in Works by Marie Watt, Nadia... Materiality and Collective Experience Sewing as Artistic Practice in Works by Marie Watt, Nadia Myre, and Bonnie Devine cynthia fowler Over the last few years there has been a growing recognition of the trend among contemporary artists to engage methods and materials traditionally associated with craft. This trend is noted by Shu Hung and Joseph Magliaro in their 2007 book titled By Hand: The Use of Craft in Contemporary Art, which introduces the reader to a diverse group of young artists engaging the craft tradition in their work.1 Similarly, the threeday symposium "Craft at the Limits," held at the Getty Museum in 2007, focused on the significant dialogue between art and craft since World War II and included sessions that specifically examined craft as it has been appropriated by contemporary artists.2 As craft historian Glenn Adamson observes, "Craft seems positively fashionable in the present moment, as artists, architects, and designers evince a fascination with process and materials not seen since the heyday of the Counterculture in the late 1960s."3 Sewing in particular has become a prevalent form of artistic expression among contemporary artists. Utilized in 1970s feminist art projects, Judy Chicago's Dinner Party (1979) being the most prominent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Materiality and Collective Experience: Sewing as Artistic Practice in Works by Marie Watt, Nadia Myre, and Bonnie Devine

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (3) – Jul 29, 2010

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
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Abstract

Materiality and Collective Experience Sewing as Artistic Practice in Works by Marie Watt, Nadia Myre, and Bonnie Devine cynthia fowler Over the last few years there has been a growing recognition of the trend among contemporary artists to engage methods and materials traditionally associated with craft. This trend is noted by Shu Hung and Joseph Magliaro in their 2007 book titled By Hand: The Use of Craft in Contemporary Art, which introduces the reader to a diverse group of young artists engaging the craft tradition in their work.1 Similarly, the threeday symposium "Craft at the Limits," held at the Getty Museum in 2007, focused on the significant dialogue between art and craft since World War II and included sessions that specifically examined craft as it has been appropriated by contemporary artists.2 As craft historian Glenn Adamson observes, "Craft seems positively fashionable in the present moment, as artists, architects, and designers evince a fascination with process and materials not seen since the heyday of the Counterculture in the late 1960s."3 Sewing in particular has become a prevalent form of artistic expression among contemporary artists. Utilized in 1970s feminist art projects, Judy Chicago's Dinner Party (1979) being the most prominent

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 29, 2010

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