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Maria Tallchief, (Native) America's Prima Ballerina: Autobiographies of a Postindian Princess

Maria Tallchief, (Native) America's Prima Ballerina: Autobiographies of a Postindian Princess Maria Tallchief, (Native) America’s Prima Ballerina Autobiographies of a Postindian Princess Shannon Toll All the girls showed an aptitude for dancing, and all were charming and well behaved. I, however, seemed to develop a special rapport with Caroline [Kennedy]. She was only eight, but she was fascinated by my background. Th at I was part American Indian enthralled her. One aft ernoon, while we were changing into street clothing aft er class, she stood alongside me and said in a whisper that she had a question. Her eyes were bright and she seemed all excited. “I want to know what it’s like being an Indian.” “Well Caroline. It’s no diff erent from being anything else. It’s my heritage and I’m proud of it. You’re Irish and French and American. Th at’s your heritage. You should be proud of that.” She peered at me directly with her father’s shining eyes. “I’d rather be an American Indian, Miss Tallchief.” Maria Tallchief with Larry Kaplan, Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina In this passage from her autobiography, Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina, Tallchief shares with her reader a moment between herself and little Caroline Kennedy, a beloved pupil of Tallchief ’ during the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Maria Tallchief, (Native) America's Prima Ballerina: Autobiographies of a Postindian Princess

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 30 (1) – May 2, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © The individual contributors
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Maria Tallchief, (Native) America’s Prima Ballerina Autobiographies of a Postindian Princess Shannon Toll All the girls showed an aptitude for dancing, and all were charming and well behaved. I, however, seemed to develop a special rapport with Caroline [Kennedy]. She was only eight, but she was fascinated by my background. Th at I was part American Indian enthralled her. One aft ernoon, while we were changing into street clothing aft er class, she stood alongside me and said in a whisper that she had a question. Her eyes were bright and she seemed all excited. “I want to know what it’s like being an Indian.” “Well Caroline. It’s no diff erent from being anything else. It’s my heritage and I’m proud of it. You’re Irish and French and American. Th at’s your heritage. You should be proud of that.” She peered at me directly with her father’s shining eyes. “I’d rather be an American Indian, Miss Tallchief.” Maria Tallchief with Larry Kaplan, Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina In this passage from her autobiography, Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina, Tallchief shares with her reader a moment between herself and little Caroline Kennedy, a beloved pupil of Tallchief ’ during the

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 2, 2018

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