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Making American Culture: A Social History 1900-1920 (review)

Making American Culture: A Social History 1900-1920 (review) where Giehmann engages in careful close readings to "imagine the Northland as wilderness." Over the past several decades, environmental and cultural critics alike have struggled to define nature and, in so doing, have debated and discussed the meaning of wilderness. By defining the latter term from the perspective of "non-native people" who idealize Western wilderness as an untouched and uncharted natural terrain, Giehmann invigorates these wilderness debates and discussions. Furthermore, Giehmann marks out her scholarly territory by persuasively pointing out that the Northland narratives of Jack London and Robert W. Service merit attention because of how they influence North American perspectives on place and space. Overall, I recommend Barbara Stefanie Giehmann's Writing the Northland to those who seek an insightful and invigorating approach to the northern narratives of London and Service. --Cara Elana Erdheim, Sacred Heart University Making American Culture: A Social History 1900­1920, by Patricia Bradley. NY: Palgrave, 2010. xii + 264 pp. Paper, $28.00. Charting the progress by which American popular culture came to be synonymous with American culture is the task Patricia Bradley sets herself in this wide-ranging treatment of American popular culture of the first two decades of the twentieth century: a time when http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Making American Culture: A Social History 1900-1920 (review)

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 6 (1) – Feb 24, 2011

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6519
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Abstract

where Giehmann engages in careful close readings to "imagine the Northland as wilderness." Over the past several decades, environmental and cultural critics alike have struggled to define nature and, in so doing, have debated and discussed the meaning of wilderness. By defining the latter term from the perspective of "non-native people" who idealize Western wilderness as an untouched and uncharted natural terrain, Giehmann invigorates these wilderness debates and discussions. Furthermore, Giehmann marks out her scholarly territory by persuasively pointing out that the Northland narratives of Jack London and Robert W. Service merit attention because of how they influence North American perspectives on place and space. Overall, I recommend Barbara Stefanie Giehmann's Writing the Northland to those who seek an insightful and invigorating approach to the northern narratives of London and Service. --Cara Elana Erdheim, Sacred Heart University Making American Culture: A Social History 1900­1920, by Patricia Bradley. NY: Palgrave, 2010. xii + 264 pp. Paper, $28.00. Charting the progress by which American popular culture came to be synonymous with American culture is the task Patricia Bradley sets herself in this wide-ranging treatment of American popular culture of the first two decades of the twentieth century: a time when

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 24, 2011

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