Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Living “As and Where We Are”: Feeling and the Emotions as Situated Poetics

Living “As and Where We Are”: Feeling and the Emotions as Situated Poetics poetics, extends feelings into emotions in order to invest his poetic objects with what he calls "the emotion-literal" (1970, 28). The externalization of emotion is a restoration to © Vol. 18, Nos. 1-2 (2010) ISSN 1069-0697, 83-98. 84 Peter Williams poetry of "its relation to the physiological condition" (58), one of the virtues Creeley saw in Olson's Projective Verse. The poem, according to Creeley, is not then a "signboard, pointing to a content ultimately to be regarded" (207), but is form as extension of content, a "stasis" for thought, inhabited by an "intelligence" expressing care for "the senses and the intensity of the emotion" (55). Feelings for modernist poets remain in the unarticulated background that Cook calls the "preconscious," that unspoken but reverberating substratum of consciousness from which poetic forms emerge. Feelings would then constitute part of what Creeley terms poetry's "physiological condition" and are therefore less demonstrable but, like moods, more constant and universal than emotions. For most theorists, however, feelings are nearly universally distrusted as either a form of knowledge or the basis for an aesthetic judgment. Hegel characterizes feeling as an empty form of subjective affection that extends beyond even vagueness into "the indefinite dull http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Living “As and Where We Are”: Feeling and the Emotions as Situated Poetics

symploke , Volume 18 (1) – May 18, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/living-as-and-where-we-are-feeling-and-the-emotions-as-situated-5t916vryG0
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-0627
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

poetics, extends feelings into emotions in order to invest his poetic objects with what he calls "the emotion-literal" (1970, 28). The externalization of emotion is a restoration to © Vol. 18, Nos. 1-2 (2010) ISSN 1069-0697, 83-98. 84 Peter Williams poetry of "its relation to the physiological condition" (58), one of the virtues Creeley saw in Olson's Projective Verse. The poem, according to Creeley, is not then a "signboard, pointing to a content ultimately to be regarded" (207), but is form as extension of content, a "stasis" for thought, inhabited by an "intelligence" expressing care for "the senses and the intensity of the emotion" (55). Feelings for modernist poets remain in the unarticulated background that Cook calls the "preconscious," that unspoken but reverberating substratum of consciousness from which poetic forms emerge. Feelings would then constitute part of what Creeley terms poetry's "physiological condition" and are therefore less demonstrable but, like moods, more constant and universal than emotions. For most theorists, however, feelings are nearly universally distrusted as either a form of knowledge or the basis for an aesthetic judgment. Hegel characterizes feeling as an empty form of subjective affection that extends beyond even vagueness into "the indefinite dull

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 18, 2011

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month