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Lines of Sight in the Western

Lines of Sight in the Western methodologies Joanna Hearne Let me start out by stating the most obvious possible fact about cinema in general: it was made for our eyes and is organized around our patterns of ocular attention, especially lines of sight, both in its apparatus of exhibition involving machines, celluloid, and light and also in its grammar of visual storytelling. Lines of sight orient us to human actions, social relations, spatial relations, and relations to that imagined environment, or landscape, that we call setting. Th ey inform the basic building blocks of fi lm language, including fundamental editing patterns of shot / reverse shot, eyeline match- es, point- of- view shots, and reaction shots, as well as composition- al conventions such as “eye room” and balance. Lines of sight also direct our attention within static or mobile shots, often through various kinds of suggestive mimicry of human vision such as sub- jective shots or on- screen vision- enhancing props like binoculars, telescopes, or rifl e sights. Our movies are always telling us about ways of seeing. Th at quintessential, originary cinematic genre, the Western, is built with the same tools as other kinds of cinema, but the Western is unique in the way http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature University of Nebraska Press

Lines of Sight in the Western

Western American Literature , Volume 53 (1) – Jun 1, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
0043-3462

Abstract

methodologies Joanna Hearne Let me start out by stating the most obvious possible fact about cinema in general: it was made for our eyes and is organized around our patterns of ocular attention, especially lines of sight, both in its apparatus of exhibition involving machines, celluloid, and light and also in its grammar of visual storytelling. Lines of sight orient us to human actions, social relations, spatial relations, and relations to that imagined environment, or landscape, that we call setting. Th ey inform the basic building blocks of fi lm language, including fundamental editing patterns of shot / reverse shot, eyeline match- es, point- of- view shots, and reaction shots, as well as composition- al conventions such as “eye room” and balance. Lines of sight also direct our attention within static or mobile shots, often through various kinds of suggestive mimicry of human vision such as sub- jective shots or on- screen vision- enhancing props like binoculars, telescopes, or rifl e sights. Our movies are always telling us about ways of seeing. Th at quintessential, originary cinematic genre, the Western, is built with the same tools as other kinds of cinema, but the Western is unique in the way

Journal

Western American LiteratureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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