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Leo Durocher's Last Stand: Anti-Semitism, Racism, and the Cubs Player Rebellion of 1971

Leo Durocher's Last Stand: Anti-Semitism, Racism, and the Cubs Player Rebellion of 1971 ARTICLES Leo Durocher's Last Stand Anti-Semitism, Racism, and the Cubs Player Rebellion of 1971 Andrew Hazucha Chicago Cubs fans, for whom the compound adjective "long-suffering" was coined, have an unfortunate and self-flagellating habit of referencing the year 1969 as empirical evidence of their unwavering loyalty to a loft y ideal in the face of a catastrophic reality. Like an army of William Faulkners, they echo in unison the Nobel Laureate's sentiments that to attach oneself to a grand cause requires a sacrifice born of the agony and sweat of the human spirit. The Cubs of '69 were such a cause. I would venture to argue, however, that 1969 has become so mythic in Cubs' lore that it often stands isolated from other years, like a disembodied limb looking for its owner or a lost migratory bird forlornly gazing into an alien horizon.1 I'd like to think of 1969 as the beginning of a larger tragedy, a tragic trilogy if you will, that ends in the dog days of August 1971, nearly two years after the conclusion of the most unforgettable year in Cubs history. In 1971 Leo Durocher was still the aging manager of the team that retained http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture University of Nebraska Press

Leo Durocher's Last Stand: Anti-Semitism, Racism, and the Cubs Player Rebellion of 1971

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1844
Publisher site
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Abstract

ARTICLES Leo Durocher's Last Stand Anti-Semitism, Racism, and the Cubs Player Rebellion of 1971 Andrew Hazucha Chicago Cubs fans, for whom the compound adjective "long-suffering" was coined, have an unfortunate and self-flagellating habit of referencing the year 1969 as empirical evidence of their unwavering loyalty to a loft y ideal in the face of a catastrophic reality. Like an army of William Faulkners, they echo in unison the Nobel Laureate's sentiments that to attach oneself to a grand cause requires a sacrifice born of the agony and sweat of the human spirit. The Cubs of '69 were such a cause. I would venture to argue, however, that 1969 has become so mythic in Cubs' lore that it often stands isolated from other years, like a disembodied limb looking for its owner or a lost migratory bird forlornly gazing into an alien horizon.1 I'd like to think of 1969 as the beginning of a larger tragedy, a tragic trilogy if you will, that ends in the dog days of August 1971, nearly two years after the conclusion of the most unforgettable year in Cubs history. In 1971 Leo Durocher was still the aging manager of the team that retained

Journal

NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 25, 2006

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