Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Legacies of the Ever Beating Heart: Delphine Red Shirt's Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter

Legacies of the Ever Beating Heart: Delphine Red Shirt's Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter review essay Legacies of the Ever Beating Heart Delphine Red Shirt's Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter debra k. s. barker In her latest book, Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter, Lakota writer Delphine Red Shirt presents the kind of unmediated as-told-to life narrative for which we have long awaited. Her book in fact presents two orally related life stories, that of her mother, Lone Woman (Wiya Isnala), and her great-grandmother, Turtle Lung Woman (Kheglezela Chaguwi). Serving as amanuensis and then translator, Red Shirt edited a body of family stories that her mother related to her in the Lakota language over a period of two years. Lone Woman passed on in 1999, shortly after she completed the dictation of her memories and stories, never to see the book's publication in 2002. The book opens with Lone Woman's account of her grandmother's life, followed by her own story. It is not until the book's conclusion that Red Shirt steps in to narrate the moment of her mother's passing, prompting notice of how carefully she has remained in the background throughout the narration of over one hundred years of her family history. What Red Shirt has achieved in terms of its artistic and ethnographic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures uni_neb

Legacies of the Ever Beating Heart: Delphine Red Shirt's Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/legacies-of-the-ever-beating-heart-delphine-red-shirt-s-turtle-lung-egsGAN7By2
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Debra K.S. Barker
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

review essay Legacies of the Ever Beating Heart Delphine Red Shirt's Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter debra k. s. barker In her latest book, Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter, Lakota writer Delphine Red Shirt presents the kind of unmediated as-told-to life narrative for which we have long awaited. Her book in fact presents two orally related life stories, that of her mother, Lone Woman (Wiya Isnala), and her great-grandmother, Turtle Lung Woman (Kheglezela Chaguwi). Serving as amanuensis and then translator, Red Shirt edited a body of family stories that her mother related to her in the Lakota language over a period of two years. Lone Woman passed on in 1999, shortly after she completed the dictation of her memories and stories, never to see the book's publication in 2002. The book opens with Lone Woman's account of her grandmother's life, followed by her own story. It is not until the book's conclusion that Red Shirt steps in to narrate the moment of her mother's passing, prompting notice of how carefully she has remained in the background throughout the narration of over one hundred years of her family history. What Red Shirt has achieved in terms of its artistic and ethnographic

Journal

Studies in American Indian Literaturesuni_neb

Published: Nov 8, 2004

There are no references for this article.