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L’Impressionisme littéraire by Virginie Pouzet-Duzer (review)

L’Impressionisme littéraire by Virginie Pouzet-Duzer (review) French Forum Spring/Fall 2014 Vol. 39, Nos. 2­3 as a praxis performed by Baudelaire's poetry. Chapter three focuses on "La Chambre double" along with Baudelaire's many notes on money to argue for an economy that links aesthetics, morality, theology, and currency in a system of "negative correspondences" (173) in opposition to that developed in the verse poem "Correspondances." Closely reading "Harmonie du soir," the fourth and final chapter engages Benjamin's notion of now-time (Jetztzeit) and the difference between Erlebnis and Erfahrung to characterize Baudelaire's poetry as "recollection in [. . .] reshuffled hindsight" (213). It is this final chapter that brings the variations on double vision to their theoretical culmination. Taking exception with de Man's reading as overly tidy-- and perhaps overly influenced by Nietzsche--Meltzer staunchly affirms that Baudelaire's poetry "does not challenge the power of representation" (215). She thus rejects the firmly established narrative that situates Baudelaire at the cusp of a "crisis in language" that runs through Mallarmé, Breton, Artaud, and on to Blanchot and many others. This is not to say that Baudelaire is "anti-moderne" or part of the "arrière-garde." Rather, Meltzer elicits a nuanced re-evaluation of what modernity is and is not, one that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

L’Impressionisme littéraire by Virginie Pouzet-Duzer (review)

French Forum , Volume 39 (2) – Jan 9, 2014

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
Publisher site
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Abstract

French Forum Spring/Fall 2014 Vol. 39, Nos. 2­3 as a praxis performed by Baudelaire's poetry. Chapter three focuses on "La Chambre double" along with Baudelaire's many notes on money to argue for an economy that links aesthetics, morality, theology, and currency in a system of "negative correspondences" (173) in opposition to that developed in the verse poem "Correspondances." Closely reading "Harmonie du soir," the fourth and final chapter engages Benjamin's notion of now-time (Jetztzeit) and the difference between Erlebnis and Erfahrung to characterize Baudelaire's poetry as "recollection in [. . .] reshuffled hindsight" (213). It is this final chapter that brings the variations on double vision to their theoretical culmination. Taking exception with de Man's reading as overly tidy-- and perhaps overly influenced by Nietzsche--Meltzer staunchly affirms that Baudelaire's poetry "does not challenge the power of representation" (215). She thus rejects the firmly established narrative that situates Baudelaire at the cusp of a "crisis in language" that runs through Mallarmé, Breton, Artaud, and on to Blanchot and many others. This is not to say that Baudelaire is "anti-moderne" or part of the "arrière-garde." Rather, Meltzer elicits a nuanced re-evaluation of what modernity is and is not, one that

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 9, 2014

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