Keys: Press and Privacy in the Goncourts’ Charles Demailly

Keys: Press and Privacy in the Goncourts’ Charles Demailly Abstract: This article explores the connections between Second Empire fiction and journalism with particular reference to the Goncourts’ Charles Demailly . A roman à clef, the Goncourts’ novel of journalism (the first edition of which was published in 1860) sketches a portrait of the divided literary field under the Second Empire. Deeply pessimistic in its representation of the petite presse , the text stresses the gulf dividing literature from journalism and advances an argument about the media’s invasive tendencies: the newspaper, it suggests, threatens to reconfigure the limits of private life. Such concerns prove problematic: not only do the innumerable connections which bind newspaper to novel undermine the literature/journalism dichotomy, but Charles Demailly in fact appropriates the privacy-invading tendencies associated with le petit journal —making covert references in its keys to leading figures of the Second Empire literary field. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nineteenth-Century French Studies University of Nebraska Press

Keys: Press and Privacy in the Goncourts’ Charles Demailly

Nineteenth-Century French Studies, Volume 42 (3) – May 9, 2014

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1536-0172
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This article explores the connections between Second Empire fiction and journalism with particular reference to the Goncourts’ Charles Demailly . A roman à clef, the Goncourts’ novel of journalism (the first edition of which was published in 1860) sketches a portrait of the divided literary field under the Second Empire. Deeply pessimistic in its representation of the petite presse , the text stresses the gulf dividing literature from journalism and advances an argument about the media’s invasive tendencies: the newspaper, it suggests, threatens to reconfigure the limits of private life. Such concerns prove problematic: not only do the innumerable connections which bind newspaper to novel undermine the literature/journalism dichotomy, but Charles Demailly in fact appropriates the privacy-invading tendencies associated with le petit journal —making covert references in its keys to leading figures of the Second Empire literary field.

Journal

Nineteenth-Century French StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 9, 2014

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