Jordan's Principle: The Struggle to Access On-Reserve Health Care for High-Needs Indigenous Children in Canada

Jordan's Principle: The Struggle to Access On-Reserve Health Care for High-Needs Indigenous... Jordan's Principle The Struggle to Access On-Reserve Health Care for High-Needs Indigenous Children in Canada Lori Chambers and Kristin Burnett Beginning in the late 1950s, the federal and provincial governments of Canada introduced legislation intended to provide hospital and insured medical services for all Canadians. With the passage of the Medical Care Act in 1966 these services were extended to include all hospital care and medically necessary services. All services were to be informed by five principles: universality, comprehensiveness, public administration, portability, and accessibility.1 This health care system is protected by federal law and administered by the provinces and territories. However, despite these five principles, many services remain difficult to obtain. Governments are cost-conscious, and decision making within the health care system and in health care policy making is not always about the best interests of individual patients.2 This is particularly true with regard to expensive in-home services such as those required for the care of children with special needs.3 These problems are particularly acute for Indigenous people living on reserves in Canada. The unequal and different treatment of First Nations children and Indigenous people more generally is enshrined in the legal and constitutional foundations of Canada and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Jordan's Principle: The Struggle to Access On-Reserve Health Care for High-Needs Indigenous Children in Canada

The American Indian Quarterly, Volume 41 (2) – Jun 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jordan's Principle The Struggle to Access On-Reserve Health Care for High-Needs Indigenous Children in Canada Lori Chambers and Kristin Burnett Beginning in the late 1950s, the federal and provincial governments of Canada introduced legislation intended to provide hospital and insured medical services for all Canadians. With the passage of the Medical Care Act in 1966 these services were extended to include all hospital care and medically necessary services. All services were to be informed by five principles: universality, comprehensiveness, public administration, portability, and accessibility.1 This health care system is protected by federal law and administered by the provinces and territories. However, despite these five principles, many services remain difficult to obtain. Governments are cost-conscious, and decision making within the health care system and in health care policy making is not always about the best interests of individual patients.2 This is particularly true with regard to expensive in-home services such as those required for the care of children with special needs.3 These problems are particularly acute for Indigenous people living on reserves in Canada. The unequal and different treatment of First Nations children and Indigenous people more generally is enshrined in the legal and constitutional foundations of Canada and

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 20, 2017

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