Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Jolene,” Genre, and the Everyday Homoerotics of Country Music: Dolly Parton’s Loving Address of the Other Woman

“Jolene,” Genre, and the Everyday Homoerotics of Country Music: Dolly Parton’s Loving Address of... "Jolene," Genre, and the Everyday Homoerotics of Country Music Dolly Parton's Loving Address of the Other Woman Nadine Hubbs ecently a Billboard feature highlighting Dolly Parton's support of her gay fans rocked Facebook and Twitter. The combination of themes is nothing new. For years the National Enquirer has periodically blared that the curvaceous blonde hyperfemme country icon is gay. Dolly, for her part, has responded graciously and nonhomophobically. To the recurrent allegation that she is carrying on a secret relationship with her lifelong friend Judy Ogle, Parton answers, "Well, I'm not gay, but if I was, I would be privileged to have Judy as a partner!"1 I'm not here to question Dolly Parton's sexual identification. But I will discuss her signature song, "Jolene," in relation to homoerotic address and genre bending and will link this to certain questions about country music and its meanings in American culture.2 Parton wrote "Jolene" and recorded it in 1973, and in early 1974 it went to number 1 on the country charts. Since then "Jolene" has had many lives as a cover song recorded by a variety of mostly female artists in a dazzling range of styles; in 2011 it posted at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

“Jolene,” Genre, and the Everyday Homoerotics of Country Music: Dolly Parton’s Loving Address of the Other Woman

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/jolene-genre-and-the-everyday-homoerotics-of-country-music-dolly-Dd9axh21rV
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Jolene," Genre, and the Everyday Homoerotics of Country Music Dolly Parton's Loving Address of the Other Woman Nadine Hubbs ecently a Billboard feature highlighting Dolly Parton's support of her gay fans rocked Facebook and Twitter. The combination of themes is nothing new. For years the National Enquirer has periodically blared that the curvaceous blonde hyperfemme country icon is gay. Dolly, for her part, has responded graciously and nonhomophobically. To the recurrent allegation that she is carrying on a secret relationship with her lifelong friend Judy Ogle, Parton answers, "Well, I'm not gay, but if I was, I would be privileged to have Judy as a partner!"1 I'm not here to question Dolly Parton's sexual identification. But I will discuss her signature song, "Jolene," in relation to homoerotic address and genre bending and will link this to certain questions about country music and its meanings in American culture.2 Parton wrote "Jolene" and recorded it in 1973, and in early 1974 it went to number 1 on the country charts. Since then "Jolene" has had many lives as a cover song recorded by a variety of mostly female artists in a dazzling range of styles; in 2011 it posted at

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 10, 2015

There are no references for this article.