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John Dominis Holt's Kanaka Maoli Modernism

John Dominis Holt's Kanaka Maoli Modernism JOHN DOMINIS HOLT’S KANAKA MAOLI MODERNISM PAUL LYONS ‘Auwe, he wā hou kēia [these are new times.] Eia nō na‘e, koe ke ‘ala [But the fragrance lingers]. —John Dominis Holt (1993) Placing “Kanaka Maoli” (or “Hawaiian” or “‘Ōiwi”) before theoretical or periodizing terms with European histories has become one critical component of Kanaka Maoli scholarship in English. Kanaka Maoli scholars writing about Hawaiian epistemology (Meyer), Hawaiian aesthetics (McDougall), Kanaka geographies (Oliveira, Chang), ‘Ōiwi methodologies (Oliveira and Wright) or Hawaiian literary nationalism (hoomanawanui), put Native well-being and ways of knowing fi rst. The control terms are reordered, emphasizing that the European categories must be indigenized if they are to do critical work. That scholarship connected to indigenous resurgence (re)takes place within and often against terms that go on threatening to delimit and distort Native thought is a complex effect of ongoing colonialism, globalization, and linguistic hierarchies. The rearticulation of European terms has been enabled by increased access to the rich and diverse print archives in ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language), yet translation remains necessary for those who do not know ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i and for participation in trans-indigenous and global fora. Aligning terms and categories toward indigenous thought is one way that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke uni_neb

John Dominis Holt's Kanaka Maoli Modernism

symploke , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

JOHN DOMINIS HOLT’S KANAKA MAOLI MODERNISM PAUL LYONS ‘Auwe, he wā hou kēia [these are new times.] Eia nō na‘e, koe ke ‘ala [But the fragrance lingers]. —John Dominis Holt (1993) Placing “Kanaka Maoli” (or “Hawaiian” or “‘Ōiwi”) before theoretical or periodizing terms with European histories has become one critical component of Kanaka Maoli scholarship in English. Kanaka Maoli scholars writing about Hawaiian epistemology (Meyer), Hawaiian aesthetics (McDougall), Kanaka geographies (Oliveira, Chang), ‘Ōiwi methodologies (Oliveira and Wright) or Hawaiian literary nationalism (hoomanawanui), put Native well-being and ways of knowing fi rst. The control terms are reordered, emphasizing that the European categories must be indigenized if they are to do critical work. That scholarship connected to indigenous resurgence (re)takes place within and often against terms that go on threatening to delimit and distort Native thought is a complex effect of ongoing colonialism, globalization, and linguistic hierarchies. The rearticulation of European terms has been enabled by increased access to the rich and diverse print archives in ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language), yet translation remains necessary for those who do not know ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i and for participation in trans-indigenous and global fora. Aligning terms and categories toward indigenous thought is one way that

Journal

symplokeuni_neb

Published: Nov 28, 2018

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