Jail Sentences: Representing Prison in Twentieth-Century French Fiction (review)

Jail Sentences: Representing Prison in Twentieth-Century French Fiction (review) 154 / French Forum / Spring 2009 / Vol. 34, No. 2 odology, and her definition of the "tolerance system," Cragin must better demonstrate that the canards (and their readers) were as heavily controlled, classified, and marginalized as prostitutes and their fictive counterparts (and their readers) at roughly the same time.2 His account fails, that is, to give more concrete social meaning to the acts of "resistance" he sees in operation as the canards continued to be produced, circulated and consumed for longer, and with less change to their form and content, than we might expect to find in the era when "everything that is solid melt[ed] into air." For what precisely is being resisted apart from "modernization" per se? André Dombrowski University of Pennsylvania Notes 1. Jean-Pierre Seguin published several texts focusing exclusively on the canards in the 1950s. French studies on crime and the popular press such as Dominique Blanc and Daniel Fabre's Le Brigand de Cavanac: le fait divers, le roman, l'histoire (Lagrasse: Verdier, 1982), and Dominique Kalifa's L'Encre et le sang: récits de crimes et société à la Belle Époque (Paris: Fayard, 1995) share some of Cragin's territory. There are equivalent studies on the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

Jail Sentences: Representing Prison in Twentieth-Century French Fiction (review)

French Forum, Volume 34 (2) – Jan 31, 2009

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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1534-1836
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Abstract

154 / French Forum / Spring 2009 / Vol. 34, No. 2 odology, and her definition of the "tolerance system," Cragin must better demonstrate that the canards (and their readers) were as heavily controlled, classified, and marginalized as prostitutes and their fictive counterparts (and their readers) at roughly the same time.2 His account fails, that is, to give more concrete social meaning to the acts of "resistance" he sees in operation as the canards continued to be produced, circulated and consumed for longer, and with less change to their form and content, than we might expect to find in the era when "everything that is solid melt[ed] into air." For what precisely is being resisted apart from "modernization" per se? André Dombrowski University of Pennsylvania Notes 1. Jean-Pierre Seguin published several texts focusing exclusively on the canards in the 1950s. French studies on crime and the popular press such as Dominique Blanc and Daniel Fabre's Le Brigand de Cavanac: le fait divers, le roman, l'histoire (Lagrasse: Verdier, 1982), and Dominique Kalifa's L'Encre et le sang: récits de crimes et société à la Belle Époque (Paris: Fayard, 1995) share some of Cragin's territory. There are equivalent studies on the

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 31, 2009

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