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Jack London's London Publisher

Jack London's London Publisher Joseph McAleer, Independent Scholar In January 1911, Jack London was not a happy author. He was on the verge of tearing up his publishing contract with an English firm that had been issuing editions of his books for Great Britain and the "Colonies," primarily Australia and New Zealand. As we know from his letters and semiautobiographical novels such as Martin Eden (1909), London took a passionate interest in his own business affairs, and his quarrels over royalties and publishing schedules were intense and sometimes abusive. Sounding a lot like Martin Eden, victim of the publishing elite, London called his English publisher a "cad, snob, bounder, four-flusher, hog" and a "Petticoat Lane huckster," and warned, "Personally, my feeling is, that if ever I should meet you, I should pull your nose."1 By 1911 Jack London was at the top of his form, enjoying worldwide acclaim as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, among other titles. He was America's first millionaire novelist, with a prodigious output of fiction and non-fiction in book, newspaper, and magazine form. When it came to publishing, he was a study in contrasts, as anxious to take direction as he was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Jack London's London Publisher

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 6 (1) – Feb 24, 2011

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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1944-6519
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Abstract

Joseph McAleer, Independent Scholar In January 1911, Jack London was not a happy author. He was on the verge of tearing up his publishing contract with an English firm that had been issuing editions of his books for Great Britain and the "Colonies," primarily Australia and New Zealand. As we know from his letters and semiautobiographical novels such as Martin Eden (1909), London took a passionate interest in his own business affairs, and his quarrels over royalties and publishing schedules were intense and sometimes abusive. Sounding a lot like Martin Eden, victim of the publishing elite, London called his English publisher a "cad, snob, bounder, four-flusher, hog" and a "Petticoat Lane huckster," and warned, "Personally, my feeling is, that if ever I should meet you, I should pull your nose."1 By 1911 Jack London was at the top of his form, enjoying worldwide acclaim as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, among other titles. He was America's first millionaire novelist, with a prodigious output of fiction and non-fiction in book, newspaper, and magazine form. When it came to publishing, he was a study in contrasts, as anxious to take direction as he was

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 24, 2011

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