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Itch Like Crazy (review)

Itch Like Crazy (review) Book Reviews Native American Spirituality rests on Irwin's conclusion that: The character of religious resistance is grounded in the confrontation between various cultural monomyths and the struggle for any people to value the uniqueness of their own spiritual practices. Only when we fully affirm those practices as living resources for our mutual betterment can we move past the need for legislation and legal protections for what is, in fact, a right of all human beings--the free exercise of their religious beliefs. (309) Native American Spirituality clearly illuminates the benefits to traditional scholarship in the move from "determinism to indeterminancy," from "univocalism to polyvocality, objectivity to partial perspectives, unity to montage, and canonical interpretations to postcolonial ones" (Churchill 225). This move shows how writing about Native religions more nearly resembles novel writing--full of real and diverse characters interacting and conversing about the various and complex worlds they (we) inhabit and share, characters who also recognize their (our) mutual obligations to make the world habitable (free from exploitation) for all sentient beings. Wendy Rose. Itch Like Crazy. Sun Tracks: An American Indian Literary Series. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2002. 121 pp. Margaret Dubin Everyone has a family, absent or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures uni_neb

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Margaret D. Dubin
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews Native American Spirituality rests on Irwin's conclusion that: The character of religious resistance is grounded in the confrontation between various cultural monomyths and the struggle for any people to value the uniqueness of their own spiritual practices. Only when we fully affirm those practices as living resources for our mutual betterment can we move past the need for legislation and legal protections for what is, in fact, a right of all human beings--the free exercise of their religious beliefs. (309) Native American Spirituality clearly illuminates the benefits to traditional scholarship in the move from "determinism to indeterminancy," from "univocalism to polyvocality, objectivity to partial perspectives, unity to montage, and canonical interpretations to postcolonial ones" (Churchill 225). This move shows how writing about Native religions more nearly resembles novel writing--full of real and diverse characters interacting and conversing about the various and complex worlds they (we) inhabit and share, characters who also recognize their (our) mutual obligations to make the world habitable (free from exploitation) for all sentient beings. Wendy Rose. Itch Like Crazy. Sun Tracks: An American Indian Literary Series. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2002. 121 pp. Margaret Dubin Everyone has a family, absent or

Journal

Studies in American Indian Literaturesuni_neb

Published: May 4, 2004

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