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Islands of Empire: Pop Culture and U.S. Power by Camilla Fojas (review)

Islands of Empire: Pop Culture and U.S. Power by Camilla Fojas (review) Book Notes text by David Farrell Krell and Michael Naas. For Leitch, French Theory's second life consists not, as one might have assumed, in the new wave of compelling, invigorating, and influential contemporary thinkers coming out of France right now--i.e. what Ian James has dubbed "The New French Philosophy" in a fine book of that name (this was somewhat disappointing for this reviewer, who had hoped to see mentions of the likes of Malabou, Laruelle, Stengers, Meillassoux, Latour, Tristan Garcia, et. al., and their relevance to current work and trends). Rather, Leitch predicts, probably accurately, that Derrida (like his beloved specters), Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, and company will continue to haunt us through the long-term project of posthumously publishing their seminars, lectures, and papers--Derrida's seminars alone will run over forty volumes in an archival enterprise of 2pac-ian proportions. Forget "publish or perish"--in French Theory's second life there is an imperative to publish, perish, and then keep publishing. Given Leitch's overall exuberance and the intellectual generosity exhibited in this book, it may seem cheap to forage for lacunas and missed connections. Yet Leitch's explicit claim to total, comprehensive mapping ("as my map on the flyleaf suggests, twenty-first-century theory is knowable http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Islands of Empire: Pop Culture and U.S. Power by Camilla Fojas (review)

symploke , Volume 23 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Notes text by David Farrell Krell and Michael Naas. For Leitch, French Theory's second life consists not, as one might have assumed, in the new wave of compelling, invigorating, and influential contemporary thinkers coming out of France right now--i.e. what Ian James has dubbed "The New French Philosophy" in a fine book of that name (this was somewhat disappointing for this reviewer, who had hoped to see mentions of the likes of Malabou, Laruelle, Stengers, Meillassoux, Latour, Tristan Garcia, et. al., and their relevance to current work and trends). Rather, Leitch predicts, probably accurately, that Derrida (like his beloved specters), Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, and company will continue to haunt us through the long-term project of posthumously publishing their seminars, lectures, and papers--Derrida's seminars alone will run over forty volumes in an archival enterprise of 2pac-ian proportions. Forget "publish or perish"--in French Theory's second life there is an imperative to publish, perish, and then keep publishing. Given Leitch's overall exuberance and the intellectual generosity exhibited in this book, it may seem cheap to forage for lacunas and missed connections. Yet Leitch's explicit claim to total, comprehensive mapping ("as my map on the flyleaf suggests, twenty-first-century theory is knowable

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

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