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Introduction: Oceania in Theory

Introduction: Oceania in Theory MAEBH LONG “Oceania is vast, Oceania is expanding, Oceania is hospitable and gener- ous, Oceania is humanity rising from the depth of brine and regions of fi re deeper still” —Epeli Hau‘ofa, “Our Sea of Islands” (2008) In 1976, in the fi rst issue of Mana Review: A South Pacifi c Journal of Language and Literature, Albert Wendt wrote of a new Oceania. Oceania, a region European maps and fi ctions fi rst referred to as the South Seas, then the South Pacifi c, sometimes the Pacifi c Basin, and now most commonly the Pacifi c Islands, is the geographic region including Hawai‘i in the north, Aotearoa/ New Zealand in the south, Rapa Nui/Easter Island in the east and Palau—or Australia, sometimes included in geographies of Oceania—in the west. For Wendt, the movement towards a new Oceania was a journey to seeing the region afresh, through the lens of local literary and artistic interventions into the decolonising island states. Wendt’s attempt to propagate and promote an Oceanian artistic renaissance called for an engagement with the region that would far exceed that of the boardrooms of politicians and development experts. The new Oceania required a different form of engagement, one http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Introduction: Oceania in Theory

symploke , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

MAEBH LONG “Oceania is vast, Oceania is expanding, Oceania is hospitable and gener- ous, Oceania is humanity rising from the depth of brine and regions of fi re deeper still” —Epeli Hau‘ofa, “Our Sea of Islands” (2008) In 1976, in the fi rst issue of Mana Review: A South Pacifi c Journal of Language and Literature, Albert Wendt wrote of a new Oceania. Oceania, a region European maps and fi ctions fi rst referred to as the South Seas, then the South Pacifi c, sometimes the Pacifi c Basin, and now most commonly the Pacifi c Islands, is the geographic region including Hawai‘i in the north, Aotearoa/ New Zealand in the south, Rapa Nui/Easter Island in the east and Palau—or Australia, sometimes included in geographies of Oceania—in the west. For Wendt, the movement towards a new Oceania was a journey to seeing the region afresh, through the lens of local literary and artistic interventions into the decolonising island states. Wendt’s attempt to propagate and promote an Oceanian artistic renaissance called for an engagement with the region that would far exceed that of the boardrooms of politicians and development experts. The new Oceania required a different form of engagement, one

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 28, 2018

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