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Introduction

Introduction Prairie Schooner is pleased to present this portfolio of ekphrastic poems, which explores the dynamic interplay between poetry and visual art. Ekphrasis, the Greek word for description, dates back to ancient rhetorical practices and has continued to be variously defined by twentieth-century writers from Gertrude Stein, the "literary cubist" who first published her prose poem portraits "Matisse" and "Picasso" in Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Work, to Frank O'Hara, poet and curator for The Museum of Modern Art, whose love poem "Sharing a Coke with You" ambitiously invokes paintings by Marcel Duchamp and Marino Marini, as well as two "schools" of art, Futurism and Impressionism. For Stein, O'Hara, and other writers, ekphrastic poetry was evidence of interart alliances, some of which developed into the wide-scale aesthetic movements of Dada, the Harlem Renaissance, New York School, San Francisco Renaissance, and the Black Arts Movement. In these post-post-modern times in which conventional categories in the arts continue to be challenged and revised, what is the current state of ekphrasis ­ an interdisciplinary mode of discourse that depicts in words the art of seeing informed by all of the senses? In recent years a proliferation of books of poetry have been published that, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Prairie Schooner is pleased to present this portfolio of ekphrastic poems, which explores the dynamic interplay between poetry and visual art. Ekphrasis, the Greek word for description, dates back to ancient rhetorical practices and has continued to be variously defined by twentieth-century writers from Gertrude Stein, the "literary cubist" who first published her prose poem portraits "Matisse" and "Picasso" in Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Work, to Frank O'Hara, poet and curator for The Museum of Modern Art, whose love poem "Sharing a Coke with You" ambitiously invokes paintings by Marcel Duchamp and Marino Marini, as well as two "schools" of art, Futurism and Impressionism. For Stein, O'Hara, and other writers, ekphrastic poetry was evidence of interart alliances, some of which developed into the wide-scale aesthetic movements of Dada, the Harlem Renaissance, New York School, San Francisco Renaissance, and the Black Arts Movement. In these post-post-modern times in which conventional categories in the arts continue to be challenged and revised, what is the current state of ekphrasis ­ an interdisciplinary mode of discourse that depicts in words the art of seeing informed by all of the senses? In recent years a proliferation of books of poetry have been published that,

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 18, 2005

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