Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction

Introduction gayle gullett and susan e. gray Dear Readers, The relationship between epistemology and feminism is old and deep. Femi- nism, with its challenge to so many “truths” of society and concomitant desire to persuade others to accept its values, has long found epistemology, the study of ways of knowing, a most useful instrument. In this issue Kristie Dotson warns feminists of the dangers of engaging in epistemic injustice. While Dot- son’s article is the only one in this issue formally concerned with epistemol- ogy, we (the editors) see in all the pieces a shared interest in epistemology. Ad- mittedly, we perceive this unifying theme because we are following a Frontiers tradition of perceiving all issues, however diverse and disparate their contents, as linked with a common thread. Still, we think that if readers look broadly and generously at this particular issue, they too will see a common thread of epistemological inquiry. Kristie Dotson begins her analysis with two signifi cant examples of injus- tice—testimonial and hermeneutical—examined by Miranda Fricker in her book Epistemic Injustice. But Dotson additionally contends that one more type of epistemic injustice must be acknowledged, namely, contributory in- justice. Such an injustice occurs when someone’s unique http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/introduction-NTA03Ubutd
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

gayle gullett and susan e. gray Dear Readers, The relationship between epistemology and feminism is old and deep. Femi- nism, with its challenge to so many “truths” of society and concomitant desire to persuade others to accept its values, has long found epistemology, the study of ways of knowing, a most useful instrument. In this issue Kristie Dotson warns feminists of the dangers of engaging in epistemic injustice. While Dot- son’s article is the only one in this issue formally concerned with epistemol- ogy, we (the editors) see in all the pieces a shared interest in epistemology. Ad- mittedly, we perceive this unifying theme because we are following a Frontiers tradition of perceiving all issues, however diverse and disparate their contents, as linked with a common thread. Still, we think that if readers look broadly and generously at this particular issue, they too will see a common thread of epistemological inquiry. Kristie Dotson begins her analysis with two signifi cant examples of injus- tice—testimonial and hermeneutical—examined by Miranda Fricker in her book Epistemic Injustice. But Dotson additionally contends that one more type of epistemic injustice must be acknowledged, namely, contributory in- justice. Such an injustice occurs when someone’s unique

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 20, 2012

There are no references for this article.