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Introduction

Introduction Jeanne Campbell Reesman, University of Texas at San Antonio Jack London’s Th e Road (1907), a forerunner of all American road stories afterwards, is a fascinating opening into London’s own confl icting dreams and fears about what “the Road” meant in his own life and writing, refl ecting reality and metaphor and revealing what his freedoms and limitations might be. Th e Road is about pursuing an uncertain dream, as later writers would also pursue on the railroads and highways of a twentieth- century America. Setting out with some “Road Kids” in 1892 and crossing the Sierra Nevada hiding in and under and on top of trains, London was also to hit the road when he joined California’s Kelly’s Army and hoboed his way East to meet up with Coxey’s Army in 1894, a nationally organized march by out- of- work men marching to Washington, DC, to protest the government’s labor and economic policies. Th ough he deserted Coxey’s Army at Hannibal, Missouri, when the Army ran out of food, and continued to New York City, hoboing on his own before riding the US and Canadian rails home to California, his Tramp Diary, his essays and stories on hoboing, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Studies in American Naturalism
ISSN
1944-6519

Abstract

Jeanne Campbell Reesman, University of Texas at San Antonio Jack London’s Th e Road (1907), a forerunner of all American road stories afterwards, is a fascinating opening into London’s own confl icting dreams and fears about what “the Road” meant in his own life and writing, refl ecting reality and metaphor and revealing what his freedoms and limitations might be. Th e Road is about pursuing an uncertain dream, as later writers would also pursue on the railroads and highways of a twentieth- century America. Setting out with some “Road Kids” in 1892 and crossing the Sierra Nevada hiding in and under and on top of trains, London was also to hit the road when he joined California’s Kelly’s Army and hoboed his way East to meet up with Coxey’s Army in 1894, a nationally organized march by out- of- work men marching to Washington, DC, to protest the government’s labor and economic policies. Th ough he deserted Coxey’s Army at Hannibal, Missouri, when the Army ran out of food, and continued to New York City, hoboing on his own before riding the US and Canadian rails home to California, his Tramp Diary, his essays and stories on hoboing,

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 19, 2019

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