Institutional Influences that Promote Studying Down in Engineering Diversity Research

Institutional Influences that Promote Studying Down in Engineering Diversity Research Kacey Beddoes Despite a thirty-year history of initiatives and interventions to recruit and retain women and other minority engineering students, women remain a minority in engineering, and enrollments of female engineering students have declined from gains made in the 1980s and 1990s.1 In the United States, enrollments of female students seem to peak and plateau at around 20 percent, with many institutions having a much lower percentage than that. Enrollments of people of color are on average even lower. Significant time, energy, and money has been spent trying to increase diversity (read: numbers of minority students) but has not led to the desired gains in enrollments of female and other minority students. In the spring of 2013 the following text appeared in a job announcement for a newly created position called director of diversity research, located within a college of engineering at a large public research university in the midwestern region of the United States: Principal duties: The College of Engineering recognizes that in order to ensure successful outcomes, diversity programs require leadership that has the experience, training and expertise to apply the appropriate theory and research framework to program development, implementation, administration, and evaluation. This approach allows http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Institutional Influences that Promote Studying Down in Engineering Diversity Research

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, Volume 38 (1) – Apr 12, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

Kacey Beddoes Despite a thirty-year history of initiatives and interventions to recruit and retain women and other minority engineering students, women remain a minority in engineering, and enrollments of female engineering students have declined from gains made in the 1980s and 1990s.1 In the United States, enrollments of female students seem to peak and plateau at around 20 percent, with many institutions having a much lower percentage than that. Enrollments of people of color are on average even lower. Significant time, energy, and money has been spent trying to increase diversity (read: numbers of minority students) but has not led to the desired gains in enrollments of female and other minority students. In the spring of 2013 the following text appeared in a job announcement for a newly created position called director of diversity research, located within a college of engineering at a large public research university in the midwestern region of the United States: Principal duties: The College of Engineering recognizes that in order to ensure successful outcomes, diversity programs require leadership that has the experience, training and expertise to apply the appropriate theory and research framework to program development, implementation, administration, and evaluation. This approach allows

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 12, 2017

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