Indigenous Studies and “the Sacred”

Indigenous Studies and “the Sacred” Mary L. Keller I don't want to call it a sacred site because your idea of something sacred and my idea of something sacred are a little bit different. Grant Bulltail, 2003 This study of the sacred as a categorical tripping point at the intersection of Indigenous studies and the history of religions begins with the words of Grant Bulltail, an Apsáalooke (Crow) elder, recorded on video when he traveled from his home on the Crow Reservation in Montana to speak to schoolchildren in Cody, Wyoming, about an extraordinary landmark, Heart Mountain. In the quotation above, Mr. Bulltail was addressing the categorical problem that exists when he discusses the sacred with people from the dominant Anglo-Christian culture. He has to set the stage that there are two different worlds of meaning with regard to "the sacred" before he can discuss what Heart Mountain means to him. His words and that mountain are the ground upon which the following questions stand: Is sacred a category that merits continued development in the service of Indigenous studies? Is it best avoided as the appendix on a body of passé, Eurocentric, dualistic thought? Will Indigenous studies methodology be served best to move http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Indigenous Studies and “the Sacred”

The American Indian Quarterly, Volume 38 (1) – Dec 20, 2014

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mary L. Keller I don't want to call it a sacred site because your idea of something sacred and my idea of something sacred are a little bit different. Grant Bulltail, 2003 This study of the sacred as a categorical tripping point at the intersection of Indigenous studies and the history of religions begins with the words of Grant Bulltail, an Apsáalooke (Crow) elder, recorded on video when he traveled from his home on the Crow Reservation in Montana to speak to schoolchildren in Cody, Wyoming, about an extraordinary landmark, Heart Mountain. In the quotation above, Mr. Bulltail was addressing the categorical problem that exists when he discusses the sacred with people from the dominant Anglo-Christian culture. He has to set the stage that there are two different worlds of meaning with regard to "the sacred" before he can discuss what Heart Mountain means to him. His words and that mountain are the ground upon which the following questions stand: Is sacred a category that merits continued development in the service of Indigenous studies? Is it best avoided as the appendix on a body of passé, Eurocentric, dualistic thought? Will Indigenous studies methodology be served best to move

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 20, 2014

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