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Images and Imagination: Toward a Conversation about Eighteenth-Century Euchee History

Images and Imagination: Toward a Conversation about Eighteenth-Century Euchee History and the process of coming to those conclusions more dialogic. To my colleagues in Native American history who are engaged with Native communities, I present what follows not as an example of "best practices"--I am not qualified to make a judgment of that sort--but simply as an illustration of how one scholar attempted to present his work to, and continue a conversation with, one Native community. And finally, to my colleagues among the Euchees themselves, I present this essay as a marker both of the dialogue fostered by the symposium and of my gratitude for their hospitality in allowing me to take part in that conversation. We might profitably begin our discussion of eighteenth-century Euchee history by investigating the larger world that they inhabited. Consider, for example, this 1737 Chickasaw map of the South (fig. 1). The Euchees appear on the map; they are the small circle labeled D. Now, what does this map tell us about their world?2 To begin with, the Euchees in 1737 inhabited an Indian-dominated region. The map shows us that in any number of ways. Most obviously, the circles denoting the British (A) and French (I) are both quite small and quite literally http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native South University of Nebraska Press

Images and Imagination: Toward a Conversation about Eighteenth-Century Euchee History

Native South , Volume 5 (1) – Aug 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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2152-4025
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Abstract

and the process of coming to those conclusions more dialogic. To my colleagues in Native American history who are engaged with Native communities, I present what follows not as an example of "best practices"--I am not qualified to make a judgment of that sort--but simply as an illustration of how one scholar attempted to present his work to, and continue a conversation with, one Native community. And finally, to my colleagues among the Euchees themselves, I present this essay as a marker both of the dialogue fostered by the symposium and of my gratitude for their hospitality in allowing me to take part in that conversation. We might profitably begin our discussion of eighteenth-century Euchee history by investigating the larger world that they inhabited. Consider, for example, this 1737 Chickasaw map of the South (fig. 1). The Euchees appear on the map; they are the small circle labeled D. Now, what does this map tell us about their world?2 To begin with, the Euchees in 1737 inhabited an Indian-dominated region. The map shows us that in any number of ways. Most obviously, the circles denoting the British (A) and French (I) are both quite small and quite literally

Journal

Native SouthUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 19, 2012

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