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Weaving the Boundary by Karenne Wood (review)

Weaving the Boundary by Karenne Wood (review) Book Reviews Karenne Wood. Weaving the Boundary. Sun Tracks. U of Arizona P, 2016. ISBN: 978- 0- 8165- 3257- 5. 78 pp. Robin Riley Fast Karenne Wood’s second collection of poems, Weaving the Boundary, builds on some of the dominant themes of her fi rst, Markings on Earth, to powerful eff ect. Land, history, language, loss and questions of recov- ery, the meanings of intimacy in contexts that redefi ne the personal and communal— these are the concerns that compel a collection both beau- tiful and disturbing in which the beautiful and the disturbing are some- times breathtakingly merged. The two books’ titles suggest their common grounding— “earth” and “boundary”— but “markings” and “weaving,” noun and verb, intimate a subtle difference. The “markings on earth” of the earlier book’s title poem are material relics, ruins, traces of ancient mounds, “remains / of ancestors” (Wood 27). Likewise, the title poem locates the book histor- ically and emotionally in a particular known and loved place, Wood’s Monacan tribe’s Virginia homeland. The poems that begin and end the book, as well as most of its explicit geographical and cultural references to indigenous experience, affirm that location. Describing the book in this way, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Weaving the Boundary by Karenne Wood (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © The individual contributors
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Book Reviews Karenne Wood. Weaving the Boundary. Sun Tracks. U of Arizona P, 2016. ISBN: 978- 0- 8165- 3257- 5. 78 pp. Robin Riley Fast Karenne Wood’s second collection of poems, Weaving the Boundary, builds on some of the dominant themes of her fi rst, Markings on Earth, to powerful eff ect. Land, history, language, loss and questions of recov- ery, the meanings of intimacy in contexts that redefi ne the personal and communal— these are the concerns that compel a collection both beau- tiful and disturbing in which the beautiful and the disturbing are some- times breathtakingly merged. The two books’ titles suggest their common grounding— “earth” and “boundary”— but “markings” and “weaving,” noun and verb, intimate a subtle difference. The “markings on earth” of the earlier book’s title poem are material relics, ruins, traces of ancient mounds, “remains / of ancestors” (Wood 27). Likewise, the title poem locates the book histor- ically and emotionally in a particular known and loved place, Wood’s Monacan tribe’s Virginia homeland. The poems that begin and end the book, as well as most of its explicit geographical and cultural references to indigenous experience, affirm that location. Describing the book in this way,

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 24, 2018

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