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Rants from the Hill: On Packrats, Bobcats, Wildfires, Curmudgeons, a Drunken Mary Kay Lady, and Other Encounters with the Wild in the High Desert by Michael P. Branch (review)

Rants from the Hill: On Packrats, Bobcats, Wildfires, Curmudgeons, a Drunken Mary Kay Lady, and... radiation to a Japanese balloon that shut down nuclear production. Some events occurred during Adams’s tenure as an engineer; some persisted as stories from before his time. Part 4 details the philosophy behind building government homes along with Adams’s personal experience living in one, while part 5 elaborates on some of the fl ourishing environmental aspects of the reservation, such as an elk herd and rare and new plant spe- cies. Adams’s literary and poetic responses to his experiences are the substance of part 6. His poems can increase in resonance with readers who now know their context from the previous parts. Th e last lines of “Burial Ground” seem to sum up Adams’s stance on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation: “Th e earth is full of artifacts, fossils, and ghosts. / Th e earth does not regret, only remembers” (13– 14). Th is narrative will interest people focused on environmental his- tory and the ways the United States has used western regions as areas of experimentation and containment for nuclear production. People interested in memoir will be intrigued by the way the book’s isolat- ed parts come together in the poetry refl ecting Adams’s confl icted relationship with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature University of Nebraska Press

Rants from the Hill: On Packrats, Bobcats, Wildfires, Curmudgeons, a Drunken Mary Kay Lady, and Other Encounters with the Wild in the High Desert by Michael P. Branch (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 53 (1) – Jun 1, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
0043-3462

Abstract

radiation to a Japanese balloon that shut down nuclear production. Some events occurred during Adams’s tenure as an engineer; some persisted as stories from before his time. Part 4 details the philosophy behind building government homes along with Adams’s personal experience living in one, while part 5 elaborates on some of the fl ourishing environmental aspects of the reservation, such as an elk herd and rare and new plant spe- cies. Adams’s literary and poetic responses to his experiences are the substance of part 6. His poems can increase in resonance with readers who now know their context from the previous parts. Th e last lines of “Burial Ground” seem to sum up Adams’s stance on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation: “Th e earth is full of artifacts, fossils, and ghosts. / Th e earth does not regret, only remembers” (13– 14). Th is narrative will interest people focused on environmental his- tory and the ways the United States has used western regions as areas of experimentation and containment for nuclear production. People interested in memoir will be intrigued by the way the book’s isolat- ed parts come together in the poetry refl ecting Adams’s confl icted relationship with the

Journal

Western American LiteratureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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