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Ligeia for Solo Flute (with Glissando Headjoint)

Ligeia for Solo Flute (with Glissando Headjoint) Ligeia for Solo Flute (with Glissando Headjoint) Amanda Bono Program Notes ccording to Greek mythology, Ligeia was a siren: a lethal, yet beautiful creature who was known for luring nearby sailors with her captivating Asong. In Ligeia the fl ute tells the story of the siren’s encounter with a young man, a sailor who got lost at sea and found himself on her island. Initially, the lis- tener is drawn into the story by sounds of the wind and short bits of Ligeia’s song; later, the listener hears the sounds of Ligeia capturing the sailor and drawing him underwater. As the piece unwinds, the music comes full circle, with Ligeia satisfi ed and peacefully waiting for her next victim. Performance Notes Much of the notation in this work was inspired by / borrowed from the second edition of The Other Flute: A Performance Manual of Contemporary Techniques by Robert Dick. In particular, the notation and corresponding techniques found in this work are as follows: Fig. 1. A glissando line between two pitches indicates a glissando with the headjoint. A diamond notehead above a pitch indicates the fi ngered note and headjoint position. Fig. 3. A diamond notehead with sound- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

Ligeia for Solo Flute (with Glissando Headjoint)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612

Abstract

Ligeia for Solo Flute (with Glissando Headjoint) Amanda Bono Program Notes ccording to Greek mythology, Ligeia was a siren: a lethal, yet beautiful creature who was known for luring nearby sailors with her captivating Asong. In Ligeia the fl ute tells the story of the siren’s encounter with a young man, a sailor who got lost at sea and found himself on her island. Initially, the lis- tener is drawn into the story by sounds of the wind and short bits of Ligeia’s song; later, the listener hears the sounds of Ligeia capturing the sailor and drawing him underwater. As the piece unwinds, the music comes full circle, with Ligeia satisfi ed and peacefully waiting for her next victim. Performance Notes Much of the notation in this work was inspired by / borrowed from the second edition of The Other Flute: A Performance Manual of Contemporary Techniques by Robert Dick. In particular, the notation and corresponding techniques found in this work are as follows: Fig. 1. A glissando line between two pitches indicates a glissando with the headjoint. A diamond notehead above a pitch indicates the fi ngered note and headjoint position. Fig. 3. A diamond notehead with sound-

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 17, 2018

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