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Ingeborg Bachmanns Wien by Joseph McVeigh (review)

Ingeborg Bachmanns Wien by Joseph McVeigh (review) 182 | JOURNAL OF AUSTRIAN STUDIES 50:1–2 thing less than a complete reorganization of Austrian literature aft er the war, emphasizing assistance for young authors, something he actually implemen- ted aft er his return to Austria in July of 1945. Although he relies greatly on Weigel’s own statements about his life and work, Greinert also productively utilizes the great mass of unpublished mate- rials in Weigel’s Nachlass at the Wienbibliothek. However, his citations from the Nachlass are oft en given without box or folder number, making the re- ferences less than useful for research. As with any biography there are oft en lacunae both great and small that confront the reader, and this book is no exception. For example, the author almost entirely ignores Weigel’s years as a radio personality with the Rot- Weiß- Rot network, where his shows Apro- pos Musik and In den Wind gesprochen (commentary on current issues) were among the most popular series between 1951 and 1954. And when discussing Weigel’s political views in the early Cold War years, the book only peripheral- ly touches on his extensive cooperation with the Congress for Cultural Free- dom in the 1950s, such as his co- founding of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Austrian Studies uni_neb

Ingeborg Bachmanns Wien by Joseph McVeigh (review)

Journal of Austrian Studies , Volume 50 (1) – Mar 23, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
© Austrian Studies Association
ISSN
2165-669X

Abstract

182 | JOURNAL OF AUSTRIAN STUDIES 50:1–2 thing less than a complete reorganization of Austrian literature aft er the war, emphasizing assistance for young authors, something he actually implemen- ted aft er his return to Austria in July of 1945. Although he relies greatly on Weigel’s own statements about his life and work, Greinert also productively utilizes the great mass of unpublished mate- rials in Weigel’s Nachlass at the Wienbibliothek. However, his citations from the Nachlass are oft en given without box or folder number, making the re- ferences less than useful for research. As with any biography there are oft en lacunae both great and small that confront the reader, and this book is no exception. For example, the author almost entirely ignores Weigel’s years as a radio personality with the Rot- Weiß- Rot network, where his shows Apro- pos Musik and In den Wind gesprochen (commentary on current issues) were among the most popular series between 1951 and 1954. And when discussing Weigel’s political views in the early Cold War years, the book only peripheral- ly touches on his extensive cooperation with the Congress for Cultural Free- dom in the 1950s, such as his co- founding of

Journal

Journal of Austrian Studiesuni_neb

Published: Mar 23, 2018

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