"I have not told half we suffered": Overland Trail Women's Narratives and the Genre of Suppressed Textual Mourning

"I have not told half we suffered": Overland Trail Women's Narratives and the Genre of Suppressed... carey r. voeller university of Kansas Many literary critics have noted a distinct genre of ritualized texts about mourning in Victorian America. Authors such as Lydia Sigourney, Fanny Longfellow, and Frances osgood, for example, inscribe an image of mourning that is excessive, sentimentalized, and embedded within an aspiration toward middle-class, genteel society. Yet, as this essay will show, this excessive, textualized, ritualized grief was but one of a number of strategies that women used to write about loss. nineteenth-century diaries and letters written by women bound for the West on the overland trail represent grief in an equally ritualized fashion. these writers repeatedly suppress and minimize grief over the deaths of husbands, children, and friends in order to construct an image of westering women as tough, durable, and forever moving forward. However, this alternative, but equally ritualized, pattern of textual mourning becomes apparent only when we read the gaps and silences of these women's narratives. GEnEriC DiFFErEnCES: WoMEn WritErS AnD tHE DEtAiLS oF tExtuAL proDuCtion What might account for these different textual representations of bereavement? the specific legacy, vol. 23, no. 2, 2006. copyright ©2006 the university of nebraska press, lincoln, ne details of textual production--when and how http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy University of Nebraska Press

"I have not told half we suffered": Overland Trail Women's Narratives and the Genre of Suppressed Textual Mourning

Legacy, Volume 23 (2) – Dec 20, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/i-have-not-told-half-we-suffered-overland-trail-women-s-narratives-and-z001RqGL2l
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-0643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

carey r. voeller university of Kansas Many literary critics have noted a distinct genre of ritualized texts about mourning in Victorian America. Authors such as Lydia Sigourney, Fanny Longfellow, and Frances osgood, for example, inscribe an image of mourning that is excessive, sentimentalized, and embedded within an aspiration toward middle-class, genteel society. Yet, as this essay will show, this excessive, textualized, ritualized grief was but one of a number of strategies that women used to write about loss. nineteenth-century diaries and letters written by women bound for the West on the overland trail represent grief in an equally ritualized fashion. these writers repeatedly suppress and minimize grief over the deaths of husbands, children, and friends in order to construct an image of westering women as tough, durable, and forever moving forward. However, this alternative, but equally ritualized, pattern of textual mourning becomes apparent only when we read the gaps and silences of these women's narratives. GEnEriC DiFFErEnCES: WoMEn WritErS AnD tHE DEtAiLS oF tExtuAL proDuCtion What might account for these different textual representations of bereavement? the specific legacy, vol. 23, no. 2, 2006. copyright ©2006 the university of nebraska press, lincoln, ne details of textual production--when and how

Journal

LegacyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 20, 2006

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off