<i>Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America</i> by Michael Z. Newman (review)

Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America by Michael Z. Newman (review) 552 Book Notes Michael Z. Newman. Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America. MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 2017. 252 pp. Michael Z. Newman’s Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America traces the shifting “status and identity” of video games in the 1970s and ’80s through the discourse of various groups, the gaming industry, the media, and the marketers by recreating the context of their “emergence.” This focus on “emergence” is, indeed, the key to this book in terms of what it can and cannot deliver. In short, Newman wants to explore the birth of video games on its own terms and to reproduce the arguments, concerns, and reactions to video games before conclusions about them had been reached. The book is thus not interested in economic questions or power relations, per se, though Newman does add a light gender critique throughout the book’s fi ve chapters. All in all, Atari Age reveals that much of our contemporary understanding of, and gripes with, video game and computer technology are not much different from those of yesteryear. Newman’s emphasis on, or method of, emergence is most successful when he contextualizes video games. In keeping with trends in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

<i>Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America</i> by Michael Z. Newman (review)

symploke, Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/i-atari-age-the-emergence-of-video-games-in-america-i-by-michael-z-C5pLKVGRhg
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

552 Book Notes Michael Z. Newman. Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America. MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 2017. 252 pp. Michael Z. Newman’s Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America traces the shifting “status and identity” of video games in the 1970s and ’80s through the discourse of various groups, the gaming industry, the media, and the marketers by recreating the context of their “emergence.” This focus on “emergence” is, indeed, the key to this book in terms of what it can and cannot deliver. In short, Newman wants to explore the birth of video games on its own terms and to reproduce the arguments, concerns, and reactions to video games before conclusions about them had been reached. The book is thus not interested in economic questions or power relations, per se, though Newman does add a light gender critique throughout the book’s fi ve chapters. All in all, Atari Age reveals that much of our contemporary understanding of, and gripes with, video game and computer technology are not much different from those of yesteryear. Newman’s emphasis on, or method of, emergence is most successful when he contextualizes video games. In keeping with trends in

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 28, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off