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An Aesthetics of Injury: the Narrative Wound from Baudelaire to Tarantino by Ian Fleishman (review)

An Aesthetics of Injury: the Narrative Wound from Baudelaire to Tarantino by Ian Fleishman (review) Book Reviews Ian Fleishman, An Aesthetics of Injury: the Narrative Wound from Baudelaire to Tarantino. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 2018 . 320 pp. In An Aesthetics of Injury, Ian Fleishman convincingly proposes wounding as a major narrative strategy in modernist aesthetics, one that seeks to compensate for literature’s apparent powerlessness by insisting on its duty (in Kafka’s words) to “sting” or “stab”. Fleishman’s argument refreshingly sidesteps the discourse of trauma studies, focusing instead on the aesthetics and complicated enunciative status of narrative injury. His argument emerges from a reading of the erotics of wounded female bodies in Charles Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du mal. Contemporary critics, Baudelaire, and even the prosecutor who charged Les Fleurs du mal with indecency conceived of it as wounded (through censorship) and wounding, able to injure those incautious enough to read it. Beyond the grounding figure of Baudelaire, Fleishman considers a range of authors and filmmakers who participate in the aesthetics of injury, including Kafka, Bataille, Genet, Cixous, Bach- mann, Jelinek, Haneke, and Quentin Tarantino. He also repeatedly cites the gesture of German punk author Rainald Goetz, who slashed his own forehead while giving a reading of his manifesto on literature’s duty to wound, impassively http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

An Aesthetics of Injury: the Narrative Wound from Baudelaire to Tarantino by Ian Fleishman (review)

French Forum , Volume 43 (3) – Apr 19, 2019

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836

Abstract

Book Reviews Ian Fleishman, An Aesthetics of Injury: the Narrative Wound from Baudelaire to Tarantino. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 2018 . 320 pp. In An Aesthetics of Injury, Ian Fleishman convincingly proposes wounding as a major narrative strategy in modernist aesthetics, one that seeks to compensate for literature’s apparent powerlessness by insisting on its duty (in Kafka’s words) to “sting” or “stab”. Fleishman’s argument refreshingly sidesteps the discourse of trauma studies, focusing instead on the aesthetics and complicated enunciative status of narrative injury. His argument emerges from a reading of the erotics of wounded female bodies in Charles Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du mal. Contemporary critics, Baudelaire, and even the prosecutor who charged Les Fleurs du mal with indecency conceived of it as wounded (through censorship) and wounding, able to injure those incautious enough to read it. Beyond the grounding figure of Baudelaire, Fleishman considers a range of authors and filmmakers who participate in the aesthetics of injury, including Kafka, Bataille, Genet, Cixous, Bach- mann, Jelinek, Haneke, and Quentin Tarantino. He also repeatedly cites the gesture of German punk author Rainald Goetz, who slashed his own forehead while giving a reading of his manifesto on literature’s duty to wound, impassively

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 19, 2019

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