Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Hunters at the Margin: Native People and Wildlife Conservation in the Northwest Territories (review)

Hunters at the Margin: Native People and Wildlife Conservation in the Northwest Territories (review) devoted her time to self-help projects, especially encouraging cottage industries and trade skills among the Indian women. Drawing from Laura Wright's correspondence, much of which is no longer extant, Caswell explains the goals and work of the Wright mission, recounts Iroquoian traditions told to her, and describes Seneca ceremonies witnessed, although not in a totally objective way. Despite her ethnocentric missionary bias and use of words viewed objectionable today (e.g., "pagan"), Caswell's work provides valuable information about Seneca and Cayuga life in the post­Handsome Lake era of the nineteenth century. She clearly shows that the Wrights had real concerns for the Indians and that they were with them at major times of travail. The Senecas and the Cayugas were faced with deadly epidemics, poverty and starvation, and the rapacious activities of sharks such as the Ogden Land Company, which was intent on dispossessing the Indians. Caswell is especially effective in describing Iroquois women--matrilineage, land rights, style of dancing in the longhouse, storytelling, and so on. Equally valuable are Caswell's descriptions of nineteenth-century Iroquoian beliefs, both Christian and those of the longhouse. She draws on the expertise of Seneca traditionalists such as Silverheels, who instructs her about six Iroquoian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Hunters at the Margin: Native People and Wildlife Conservation in the Northwest Territories (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (3) – Jul 29, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/hunters-at-the-margin-native-people-and-wildlife-conservation-in-the-Q0m8UfDlbD
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

devoted her time to self-help projects, especially encouraging cottage industries and trade skills among the Indian women. Drawing from Laura Wright's correspondence, much of which is no longer extant, Caswell explains the goals and work of the Wright mission, recounts Iroquoian traditions told to her, and describes Seneca ceremonies witnessed, although not in a totally objective way. Despite her ethnocentric missionary bias and use of words viewed objectionable today (e.g., "pagan"), Caswell's work provides valuable information about Seneca and Cayuga life in the post­Handsome Lake era of the nineteenth century. She clearly shows that the Wrights had real concerns for the Indians and that they were with them at major times of travail. The Senecas and the Cayugas were faced with deadly epidemics, poverty and starvation, and the rapacious activities of sharks such as the Ogden Land Company, which was intent on dispossessing the Indians. Caswell is especially effective in describing Iroquois women--matrilineage, land rights, style of dancing in the longhouse, storytelling, and so on. Equally valuable are Caswell's descriptions of nineteenth-century Iroquoian beliefs, both Christian and those of the longhouse. She draws on the expertise of Seneca traditionalists such as Silverheels, who instructs her about six Iroquoian

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 29, 2010

There are no references for this article.