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Human Together: Into the Interior of Auto/OntoPoeisis

Human Together: Into the Interior of Auto/OntoPoeisis Is posthumanism the effort to think the human beyond the western tradition of colonial modernity or yet another repetition of the idea of Man by way of its current development, namely, what Sylvia Wynter calls "its second, purely secular, biocentric, and overrepresented modality of being human" (2003, 317)? In the latter case, posthumanism runs the danger of being the appellation for discourses that promise the "end of man" while being wrapped in "a dialectics of truth and negativity" (Derrida 1982, 121) that ultimately affirms a "we" grounded in the "unity of absolute knowledge and anthropology, of God and man, of onto-theo-teleology and humanism" (1982, 121).1 Jacques Derrida warns against the false optimism of humanism that, despite its new clothes, ultimately reaffirms a certain idea of man, namely, the citizen, the documented worker, the one always already with rights. Derrida's warning is still timely, despite the promise of the post in posthumanism, that is, post western humanism, post anthropocentrism and its phallogocentric traditions, post the humanism of colonial modernity, and in the wake of the decolonization of being by the contrapuntal and overlapping efforts of thinkers like Frantz Fanon, Achille Mbembe, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Walter Mignolo, Edward Said, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Human Together: Into the Interior of Auto/OntoPoeisis

symploke , Volume 23 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627
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Abstract

Is posthumanism the effort to think the human beyond the western tradition of colonial modernity or yet another repetition of the idea of Man by way of its current development, namely, what Sylvia Wynter calls "its second, purely secular, biocentric, and overrepresented modality of being human" (2003, 317)? In the latter case, posthumanism runs the danger of being the appellation for discourses that promise the "end of man" while being wrapped in "a dialectics of truth and negativity" (Derrida 1982, 121) that ultimately affirms a "we" grounded in the "unity of absolute knowledge and anthropology, of God and man, of onto-theo-teleology and humanism" (1982, 121).1 Jacques Derrida warns against the false optimism of humanism that, despite its new clothes, ultimately reaffirms a certain idea of man, namely, the citizen, the documented worker, the one always already with rights. Derrida's warning is still timely, despite the promise of the post in posthumanism, that is, post western humanism, post anthropocentrism and its phallogocentric traditions, post the humanism of colonial modernity, and in the wake of the decolonization of being by the contrapuntal and overlapping efforts of thinkers like Frantz Fanon, Achille Mbembe, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Walter Mignolo, Edward Said, and

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

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