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How to Keep Your Language Alive: A Commonsense Approach to One-on-One Language Learning (review)

How to Keep Your Language Alive: A Commonsense Approach to One-on-One Language Learning (review) SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 ". . . bones come flowing / from museum shelves / to dance in the rippling grass . . ." (70). There is nothing haiku-like or peaceful here-- each line reports turmoil and action, even if only in the stillness of the author's mind, and Rose's style is effective in conveying this content. Rose is a prolific poet; Itch Like Crazy is her twelfth book and her second with the University of Arizona Press. Several earlier volumes of poetry were written while she attended college and university in the late 60s and 70s in the Bay Area, where she was also involved in the burgeoning American Indian Movement. Despite her overwhelmingly personal subject matter, the poems are more than narcissistic confessionals; her sparsely populated lines leave room for larger meanings. In many ways, her story is our story, the story of anyone whose "mixed" ancestry includes the powerful and the powerless and leaves us wondering where we stand. As Rose said once in an interview: "We are in fact all half-breed in this world today." Leanne Hinton with Matt Vera and Nancy Steele. How to Keep Your Language Alive: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

How to Keep Your Language Alive: A Commonsense Approach to One-on-One Language Learning (review)

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 16 (1) – May 4, 2004

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Ruth Spack
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 ". . . bones come flowing / from museum shelves / to dance in the rippling grass . . ." (70). There is nothing haiku-like or peaceful here-- each line reports turmoil and action, even if only in the stillness of the author's mind, and Rose's style is effective in conveying this content. Rose is a prolific poet; Itch Like Crazy is her twelfth book and her second with the University of Arizona Press. Several earlier volumes of poetry were written while she attended college and university in the late 60s and 70s in the Bay Area, where she was also involved in the burgeoning American Indian Movement. Despite her overwhelmingly personal subject matter, the poems are more than narcissistic confessionals; her sparsely populated lines leave room for larger meanings. In many ways, her story is our story, the story of anyone whose "mixed" ancestry includes the powerful and the powerless and leaves us wondering where we stand. As Rose said once in an interview: "We are in fact all half-breed in this world today." Leanne Hinton with Matt Vera and Nancy Steele. How to Keep Your Language Alive:

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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