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"Hope, and Keep Busy": Little Women and Critical Pedagogy in the Era of Trump

"Hope, and Keep Busy": Little Women and Critical Pedagogy in the Era of Trump “Hope, and Keep Busy”: Little Women and Critical Pedagogy in the Era of Trump Randi Lynn Tanglen Austin College In chapter 16 of Little Women, Marmee must leave Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy to go to the Union army hospital in Washington to care for Mr. March, who is dangerously ill. When the girls first hear of the peril facing their father’s life, “strangely the day darkened outside! and . . . suddenly the whole world seemed to change” (130). When the girls wake up the next morning, “[e]verything seemed very strange” (135). Jo hides her tears in the kitchen towel, and Beth and Amy “wore a grave, troubled expression, as if sorrow was a new experience to them” (135). Before their mother leaves, the four sisters gather around Marmee, who tells them to “[g]o on with your work as usual, for work is a blessed solace. Hope, and keep busy; and, whatever happens, remember that you can never be fatherless” (135). Marmee provides her daughters with the reassurance they need when their world becomes newly threatening and uncertain: you can make a difference, you are not alone, you are safe. In the early hours of November 9, 2016, after the election http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy University of Nebraska Press

"Hope, and Keep Busy": Little Women and Critical Pedagogy in the Era of Trump

Legacy , Volume 36 (1) – Jun 11, 2019

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-0643

Abstract

“Hope, and Keep Busy”: Little Women and Critical Pedagogy in the Era of Trump Randi Lynn Tanglen Austin College In chapter 16 of Little Women, Marmee must leave Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy to go to the Union army hospital in Washington to care for Mr. March, who is dangerously ill. When the girls first hear of the peril facing their father’s life, “strangely the day darkened outside! and . . . suddenly the whole world seemed to change” (130). When the girls wake up the next morning, “[e]verything seemed very strange” (135). Jo hides her tears in the kitchen towel, and Beth and Amy “wore a grave, troubled expression, as if sorrow was a new experience to them” (135). Before their mother leaves, the four sisters gather around Marmee, who tells them to “[g]o on with your work as usual, for work is a blessed solace. Hope, and keep busy; and, whatever happens, remember that you can never be fatherless” (135). Marmee provides her daughters with the reassurance they need when their world becomes newly threatening and uncertain: you can make a difference, you are not alone, you are safe. In the early hours of November 9, 2016, after the election

Journal

LegacyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 11, 2019

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