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Healing the Wounds of the Algerian Revolution in Assia Djebar’s Women of Algiers in their Apartment

Healing the Wounds of the Algerian Revolution in Assia Djebar’s Women of Algiers in their Apartment MICHAEL J. RULON The history of colonialism and its aftermath is a history of violence and war. Certainly, this includes physical violence and conventional warfare, but to acknowledge such violence is to acknowledge only a part of the damage of colonialism. As Martinican-born psychoanalyst Frantz Fanon observes, colonialism is a form of insidious psychic and social violence, and the process of decolonization is a form of counter-violence. In the opening to his work, The Wretched of the Earth (1963), he postulates that: National liberation, national reawakening, restoration of the nation to the people or Commonwealth, whatever name is used, whatever the latest expression, decolonization is always a violent event. At whatever level we study it...decolonization is quite simply the substitution of one "species" of mankind for another.... In actual fact, proof of success lies in a social fabric that has been changed inside out.... The need for this change exists in a raw, repressed, and reckless state in the lives and consciousness of colonized men and women. (Fanon 1963, 1) Colonialism is, at its most fundamental level, a form of warfare against the psyche and the self of the colonized. Although the physical violence of colonization is much http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Healing the Wounds of the Algerian Revolution in Assia Djebar’s Women of Algiers in their Apartment

symploke , Volume 23 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © 2008 symploke.
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1534-0627
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Abstract

MICHAEL J. RULON The history of colonialism and its aftermath is a history of violence and war. Certainly, this includes physical violence and conventional warfare, but to acknowledge such violence is to acknowledge only a part of the damage of colonialism. As Martinican-born psychoanalyst Frantz Fanon observes, colonialism is a form of insidious psychic and social violence, and the process of decolonization is a form of counter-violence. In the opening to his work, The Wretched of the Earth (1963), he postulates that: National liberation, national reawakening, restoration of the nation to the people or Commonwealth, whatever name is used, whatever the latest expression, decolonization is always a violent event. At whatever level we study it...decolonization is quite simply the substitution of one "species" of mankind for another.... In actual fact, proof of success lies in a social fabric that has been changed inside out.... The need for this change exists in a raw, repressed, and reckless state in the lives and consciousness of colonized men and women. (Fanon 1963, 1) Colonialism is, at its most fundamental level, a form of warfare against the psyche and the self of the colonized. Although the physical violence of colonization is much

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symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

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