Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Groundless: Rumors, Legends, and Hoaxes on the Early American Frontier by Gregory Evans Dowd (review)

Groundless: Rumors, Legends, and Hoaxes on the Early American Frontier by Gregory Evans Dowd... vided to slaves in Cherokee regions. Doll worked to avoid “social death” through working between these slave systems to protect her own sense of freedom and the emancipation of her children. Th e history Miles weaved continued into the era of Indian Removal, and beyond the death of Shoe Boots, through the fi gures of Elizabeth and Polly. Upon the Trail of Tears and into Oklahoma Territory, Elizabeth, Doll, and Polly worked to keep their family as a functioning kinship unit. On the eve of the Civil War, the Shoe Boots family lived among prosperous Oklahoman Cherokees who oft en continued traditions of slaveholding to recreate a successful market economy in the American interior, wherein slave catchers oft en pursued Afro- Cherokee peoples with impunity. In 1860 Doll passed away. Her survival had taken her from existing as the property of another to a life where she was a landowning free woman who helped her family assure a measure of freedom. Miles’s work was important initially for its use of source materials in experimental and advantageous ways. Miles searched these sources to explore the type of life that Doll lived, the categories of domesticity she would be expected to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Groundless: Rumors, Legends, and Hoaxes on the Early American Frontier by Gregory Evans Dowd (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 42 (2) – May 11, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/groundless-rumors-legends-and-hoaxes-on-the-early-american-frontier-by-hdhg67hbHV
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828

Abstract

vided to slaves in Cherokee regions. Doll worked to avoid “social death” through working between these slave systems to protect her own sense of freedom and the emancipation of her children. Th e history Miles weaved continued into the era of Indian Removal, and beyond the death of Shoe Boots, through the fi gures of Elizabeth and Polly. Upon the Trail of Tears and into Oklahoma Territory, Elizabeth, Doll, and Polly worked to keep their family as a functioning kinship unit. On the eve of the Civil War, the Shoe Boots family lived among prosperous Oklahoman Cherokees who oft en continued traditions of slaveholding to recreate a successful market economy in the American interior, wherein slave catchers oft en pursued Afro- Cherokee peoples with impunity. In 1860 Doll passed away. Her survival had taken her from existing as the property of another to a life where she was a landowning free woman who helped her family assure a measure of freedom. Miles’s work was important initially for its use of source materials in experimental and advantageous ways. Miles searched these sources to explore the type of life that Doll lived, the categories of domesticity she would be expected to

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 11, 2018

There are no references for this article.