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Gothic Silence: S. Alice Callahan's Wynema, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and the Indigenous Unspeakable

Gothic Silence: S. Alice Callahan's Wynema, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and the... Gothic Silence S. Alice Callahan’s Wynema, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and the Indigenous Unspeakable Amy Gore As far back as I can remember, I belonged to a secret society of Indian women, meeting around a kitchen table in a conspiracy to bring the past into the present. I listened, their stories settling forever in my blood, and I knew the stories were told and told not for carrying but for keeping. Th ey heard, and they taught me to hear, the truth in things not said. Th ey listened, and they taught me to listen, in the space between words. Betty Louise Bell (Cherokee), Faces in the Moon In a recent special issue on Indigenous autobiography, Michelle Raheja addresses silence as a crucial category of Indigenous writing. She iden- tifi es “intentional rhetorical silences” as a key strategy in narrations of the self and of tribal knowledges, as well as a strategy of engagement with “white- controlled literary and publishing practices” during the nineteenth century (88). Rhetorical silences act in complex ways: while textual moments of silence may indicate a variety of meanings and do not unequivocally equal passivity or victimhood, silence paradoxically works to “reveal speech” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Gothic Silence: S. Alice Callahan's Wynema, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and the Indigenous Unspeakable

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 30 (1) – May 2, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © The individual contributors
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Gothic Silence S. Alice Callahan’s Wynema, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and the Indigenous Unspeakable Amy Gore As far back as I can remember, I belonged to a secret society of Indian women, meeting around a kitchen table in a conspiracy to bring the past into the present. I listened, their stories settling forever in my blood, and I knew the stories were told and told not for carrying but for keeping. Th ey heard, and they taught me to hear, the truth in things not said. Th ey listened, and they taught me to listen, in the space between words. Betty Louise Bell (Cherokee), Faces in the Moon In a recent special issue on Indigenous autobiography, Michelle Raheja addresses silence as a crucial category of Indigenous writing. She iden- tifi es “intentional rhetorical silences” as a key strategy in narrations of the self and of tribal knowledges, as well as a strategy of engagement with “white- controlled literary and publishing practices” during the nineteenth century (88). Rhetorical silences act in complex ways: while textual moments of silence may indicate a variety of meanings and do not unequivocally equal passivity or victimhood, silence paradoxically works to “reveal speech”

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 2, 2018

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