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Getting Lost and Found and Lost and Found and Lost Again with Patti Lather

Getting Lost and Found and Lost and Found and Lost Again with Patti Lather adele e. clarke Patti Lather calls herself a feminist methodologist. I would say that she is more a feminist theorist of methodology, epistemology, and ontology--in the same senses that Donna Haraway is a feminist theorist of science, technology, and medicine studies (ST&MS).1 Like Haraway, Lather's work is not about "how" but about "what"--as in "what on earth . . . ???"--cracking open huge serious questions, opening Pandora's boxes we didn't even know Pandora had. Lather is not a (typical) methodologist in that she refuses to tell you "how to"--refuses to tell you what to do. This is actually the best kind of methodologist--a lesson I learned from Anselm Strauss who similarly refused the imperative tense. Instead he asked questions and taught us to ask ourselves questions and to ask each other questions in small working qualitative analysis groups. I first participated in such analysis groups in the early 1980s and they certainly resonated with my experiences of feminist consciousness-raising.2 Such refusals to tell people what to do are ways of insisting that those trying to learn must do it for themselves, and learners gain the potential to end up really owning their own research--however challenging the process. This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Getting Lost and Found and Lost and Found and Lost Again with Patti Lather

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 30 (1) – May 30, 2009

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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1536-0334
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Abstract

adele e. clarke Patti Lather calls herself a feminist methodologist. I would say that she is more a feminist theorist of methodology, epistemology, and ontology--in the same senses that Donna Haraway is a feminist theorist of science, technology, and medicine studies (ST&MS).1 Like Haraway, Lather's work is not about "how" but about "what"--as in "what on earth . . . ???"--cracking open huge serious questions, opening Pandora's boxes we didn't even know Pandora had. Lather is not a (typical) methodologist in that she refuses to tell you "how to"--refuses to tell you what to do. This is actually the best kind of methodologist--a lesson I learned from Anselm Strauss who similarly refused the imperative tense. Instead he asked questions and taught us to ask ourselves questions and to ask each other questions in small working qualitative analysis groups. I first participated in such analysis groups in the early 1980s and they certainly resonated with my experiences of feminist consciousness-raising.2 Such refusals to tell people what to do are ways of insisting that those trying to learn must do it for themselves, and learners gain the potential to end up really owning their own research--however challenging the process. This

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 30, 2009

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