Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

From the Editors

From the Editors tawâw! Welcome to volume 32, issues 1– 2, ofS tudies in American Indian Literatures. Th e idea of space and who is deemed worthy of support is something we’ve been thinking about. So- called polite Canadians wrung their hands over the “inconvenience” of Indigenous peoples and accom- plices occupying entrances to ports, intersections, and railways. It didn’t take long to see how settlers really feel about Indigenous peoples assert- ing sovereignty. And we’re in the middle of a pandemic, which will also signifi cantly impact reserves and remote communities without access to clean drinking water and grocery stores. In 2009, the Canadian gov- ernment sent body bags to remote Manitoba communities when they demanded more help with the H1N1 fl u outbreak. And so many reserves in Canada don’t have clean drinking water, which alongside the calls for continuing governmental hostility to land sovereignty, shows how little “reconciliation” means in Canada. It’s not surprising that many of our contributors echo the necessity for Indigenous self- representation and sovereignty. Sophie McCall’s “Re- Framing, De- Framing, and Shattering the Frames: Indigenous Writers and Artists on Representing Residential School Narratives” uses late Cree editor Greg Younging’s (who wrote Best Practices in Indigenous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/from-the-editors-w9zfVnHxYx
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

tawâw! Welcome to volume 32, issues 1– 2, ofS tudies in American Indian Literatures. Th e idea of space and who is deemed worthy of support is something we’ve been thinking about. So- called polite Canadians wrung their hands over the “inconvenience” of Indigenous peoples and accom- plices occupying entrances to ports, intersections, and railways. It didn’t take long to see how settlers really feel about Indigenous peoples assert- ing sovereignty. And we’re in the middle of a pandemic, which will also signifi cantly impact reserves and remote communities without access to clean drinking water and grocery stores. In 2009, the Canadian gov- ernment sent body bags to remote Manitoba communities when they demanded more help with the H1N1 fl u outbreak. And so many reserves in Canada don’t have clean drinking water, which alongside the calls for continuing governmental hostility to land sovereignty, shows how little “reconciliation” means in Canada. It’s not surprising that many of our contributors echo the necessity for Indigenous self- representation and sovereignty. Sophie McCall’s “Re- Framing, De- Framing, and Shattering the Frames: Indigenous Writers and Artists on Representing Residential School Narratives” uses late Cree editor Greg Younging’s (who wrote Best Practices in Indigenous

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 11, 2020

There are no references for this article.