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From the Editor

From the Editor vii aya aya niihkaania! This issue marks a major change for the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures/Studies in American Indian Literatures (ASAIL/SAIL) members and readers--it's our first issue produced by the University of Nebraska Press. By now many of you will have seen SAIL prominently included in the press's Native studies catalog, so I hope that you are as excited about holding this issue as I am! This moment has been a long time in coming. It began in 1972 when ASAIL was founded at the MLA Convention as an organization whose purpose was to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native American oral traditions. As Bob Nelson's history of SAIL (available on the website) tells us, SAIL first came to fruition in 1973 under the editorial eye of Wayne Franklin, but Karl Kroeber quickly took over editorship of the journal and began the quarterly publication of series 1 in the spring of 1977. Kroeber edited SAIL for ten years; when he stepped out of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Malea Powell
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

vii aya aya niihkaania! This issue marks a major change for the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures/Studies in American Indian Literatures (ASAIL/SAIL) members and readers--it's our first issue produced by the University of Nebraska Press. By now many of you will have seen SAIL prominently included in the press's Native studies catalog, so I hope that you are as excited about holding this issue as I am! This moment has been a long time in coming. It began in 1972 when ASAIL was founded at the MLA Convention as an organization whose purpose was to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native American oral traditions. As Bob Nelson's history of SAIL (available on the website) tells us, SAIL first came to fruition in 1973 under the editorial eye of Wayne Franklin, but Karl Kroeber quickly took over editorship of the journal and began the quarterly publication of series 1 in the spring of 1977. Kroeber edited SAIL for ten years; when he stepped out of

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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