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Foreword

Foreword gayle gullett and susan e. gray Dear Readers, This special issue, "Knowledge That Matters: Feminist Epistemology, Methodology, and Science Studies," evolved from a 2007 conference organized by scholars who analyze feminist epistemologies, methodologies, methodologies, metaphysics, and science studies (FEMMSS). Because the conference was held at Arizona State University, home of Frontiers, and, more important, because the conference's organizer, Mary Margaret Fonow, professor and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program at ASU, is a member of the Frontiers Collective, we--your editors and Mary Margaret-- quickly agreed that creating a special issue from the conference proceedings would benefit everyone. Readers of Frontiers will benefit the most. In this issue they can see feminist scholars who study the fields of science and technology engage in a most audacious and courageous act. These feminists call for scientists and those who study the disciplines of science to do nothing less than transform the very methods by which they work to achieve the feminist goals of social justice and egalitarian democracy. Because these articles are, on the one hand, so very bold and, on the other, so concerned with such basic questions of method--such as for whom should I write--readers of all http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

gayle gullett and susan e. gray Dear Readers, This special issue, "Knowledge That Matters: Feminist Epistemology, Methodology, and Science Studies," evolved from a 2007 conference organized by scholars who analyze feminist epistemologies, methodologies, methodologies, metaphysics, and science studies (FEMMSS). Because the conference was held at Arizona State University, home of Frontiers, and, more important, because the conference's organizer, Mary Margaret Fonow, professor and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program at ASU, is a member of the Frontiers Collective, we--your editors and Mary Margaret-- quickly agreed that creating a special issue from the conference proceedings would benefit everyone. Readers of Frontiers will benefit the most. In this issue they can see feminist scholars who study the fields of science and technology engage in a most audacious and courageous act. These feminists call for scientists and those who study the disciplines of science to do nothing less than transform the very methods by which they work to achieve the feminist goals of social justice and egalitarian democracy. Because these articles are, on the one hand, so very bold and, on the other, so concerned with such basic questions of method--such as for whom should I write--readers of all

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 30, 2009

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