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Feminist Currents

Feminist Currents eileen boris Today's women's movement is faltering "along a `mother-daughter' divide," claimed Susan Faludi in the October 2010 issue of Harper's Magazine.1 Faludi, the author of the acclaimed 1991 Backlash: The Undeclared War against American Women and more recently The Terror Dream: Fear and Fantasy in Post-911 America, reported that younger and older feminists, the "mothers and daughters" of the movement, are clashing in a range of political and cultural venues: elections to office of the National Organization of Women (NOW), university classrooms, journals, and blogs.2 Younger women contend their mothers' feminism isn't relevant and worse, it's stodgy--with no place for fashion, fun, and sex--and they are tired of being patronized. Older feminists fume that the younger women are narcissists, captured by consumerism, who shun older leaders, their books, and their political activism simply because of their age. Faludi believes the women's movement is in great danger, unable to pass power, authority, and legitimacy down from mothers to daughters. For this column I asked, "What do you think? Does feminism face such a divide? Do the familial metaphors of mother-daughter accurately describe this fault line in feminism? What constitutes feminism in our time?" Some of us may find http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective.
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1536-0334
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Abstract

eileen boris Today's women's movement is faltering "along a `mother-daughter' divide," claimed Susan Faludi in the October 2010 issue of Harper's Magazine.1 Faludi, the author of the acclaimed 1991 Backlash: The Undeclared War against American Women and more recently The Terror Dream: Fear and Fantasy in Post-911 America, reported that younger and older feminists, the "mothers and daughters" of the movement, are clashing in a range of political and cultural venues: elections to office of the National Organization of Women (NOW), university classrooms, journals, and blogs.2 Younger women contend their mothers' feminism isn't relevant and worse, it's stodgy--with no place for fashion, fun, and sex--and they are tired of being patronized. Older feminists fume that the younger women are narcissists, captured by consumerism, who shun older leaders, their books, and their political activism simply because of their age. Faludi believes the women's movement is in great danger, unable to pass power, authority, and legitimacy down from mothers to daughters. For this column I asked, "What do you think? Does feminism face such a divide? Do the familial metaphors of mother-daughter accurately describe this fault line in feminism? What constitutes feminism in our time?" Some of us may find

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 20, 2012

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