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Females, the Strong Ones: Listening to the Lived Experiences of American Indian Women

Females, the Strong Ones: Listening to the Lived Experiences of American Indian Women Females, the Strong Ones Listening to the Lived Experiences of American Indian Women Andrea Riley Mukavetz Gentle reader, I come to you with a good heart. In this essay, I am going to tell some stories about how American Indian women use story to theorize their lived experiences. One of the key points in this essay is the argument that we can and should use the stories American Indian women tell as theories for our research, writ- ing, and everyday lives. Drawing from my oral history work with a group of multigenerational Odawa women, Indigenous worldviews, and an Indigenous research paradigm, I use story as methodology as a form of theorization that privileges relational and accountable knowledge making. Soon I will situate story as methodology and how it functions within Indigenous rhetorics and Indigenous research practices. But first I need to introduce myself to responsibly demonstrate right relations. Boozhoo! Andrea Riley Mukavetz nindishinikaaz. I am a member of the Chippewa of Thames First Nation. I come to you from Michigan in the Three Fires territory where I have spent most of my life and consider ancestral land. I am a mixed- raced Anishinaabekwe with Chaldean and Lebanese heritages. I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Females, the Strong Ones: Listening to the Lived Experiences of American Indian Women

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © The individual contributors
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Females, the Strong Ones Listening to the Lived Experiences of American Indian Women Andrea Riley Mukavetz Gentle reader, I come to you with a good heart. In this essay, I am going to tell some stories about how American Indian women use story to theorize their lived experiences. One of the key points in this essay is the argument that we can and should use the stories American Indian women tell as theories for our research, writ- ing, and everyday lives. Drawing from my oral history work with a group of multigenerational Odawa women, Indigenous worldviews, and an Indigenous research paradigm, I use story as methodology as a form of theorization that privileges relational and accountable knowledge making. Soon I will situate story as methodology and how it functions within Indigenous rhetorics and Indigenous research practices. But first I need to introduce myself to responsibly demonstrate right relations. Boozhoo! Andrea Riley Mukavetz nindishinikaaz. I am a member of the Chippewa of Thames First Nation. I come to you from Michigan in the Three Fires territory where I have spent most of my life and consider ancestral land. I am a mixed- raced Anishinaabekwe with Chaldean and Lebanese heritages. I

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 2, 2018

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