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Farmer's Wife

Farmer's Wife My mother still lives on our eighty-acre family farm in Lebanon County, southeastern Pennsylvania. Since I live two-thousand miles away in New Mexico, I am able to visit only two times every year. When I am there, I photograph her and the spaces and things in the house and buildings. This world, especially the house, has not changed much since I spent my childhood there in the 1950s and 1960s. My mother began shaping it after she and my father took over the farm from his parents in 1947. It had been owned by four generations of his Swiss-German Anabaptist family. She was not so concerned about carrying on this heritage. Her family lived in town, and she had been a factory worker. She and my father just wanted to make this run-down farm a comfortable, modern home for us three children. They called it Sunnydell Farm. They wanted the best for us, the best that they could afford on a small dairy farm income. They encouraged us to be and to perform the best, to compete at school, in 4-H clubs, and children's contests, to go to college, and to be upwardly striving. Now the land is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

My mother still lives on our eighty-acre family farm in Lebanon County, southeastern Pennsylvania. Since I live two-thousand miles away in New Mexico, I am able to visit only two times every year. When I am there, I photograph her and the spaces and things in the house and buildings. This world, especially the house, has not changed much since I spent my childhood there in the 1950s and 1960s. My mother began shaping it after she and my father took over the farm from his parents in 1947. It had been owned by four generations of his Swiss-German Anabaptist family. She was not so concerned about carrying on this heritage. Her family lived in town, and she had been a factory worker. She and my father just wanted to make this run-down farm a comfortable, modern home for us three children. They called it Sunnydell Farm. They wanted the best for us, the best that they could afford on a small dairy farm income. They encouraged us to be and to perform the best, to compete at school, in 4-H clubs, and children's contests, to go to college, and to be upwardly striving. Now the land is

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 4, 2001

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