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Explorations in Navajo Poetry and Poetics (review)

Explorations in Navajo Poetry and Poetics (review) system available to reflection and as subject of metadiscourse to a focus on individual performance, and especially the sonic and sensory dimensions of individual performance, and the dialogic tension between these two aspects of Navajo discourse and poetics. Chapter 1 explores the shared elements between Navajo written poetry and other forms of Navajo verbal art, including such poetic elements as narrative particles, sound symbolism, and quoted speech, to argue that many Navajo poets frame their work as a form of hane', or "storytelling." At the same time, Webster explores the consequences of shifting from oral to written media and from Navajo to English as communicative code. "Code switching," for Webster, performs "the tensions between what can be transferred across languages and what cannot" (p. 48). Chapter 2 discusses sound symbolism and ideophony as a means of creating a sense of place, of interpersonal connection, and of Navajoness, both in the sense of creating community and in the sense of standing in resistance to the rationalized approaches to language and literature taught, for example, in English classes at Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding schools. In chapter 3, Webster explores some ideological dimensions of language choice among Navajo speakers and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

Explorations in Navajo Poetry and Poetics (review)

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 53 (3) – Jun 30, 2011

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6527
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Abstract

system available to reflection and as subject of metadiscourse to a focus on individual performance, and especially the sonic and sensory dimensions of individual performance, and the dialogic tension between these two aspects of Navajo discourse and poetics. Chapter 1 explores the shared elements between Navajo written poetry and other forms of Navajo verbal art, including such poetic elements as narrative particles, sound symbolism, and quoted speech, to argue that many Navajo poets frame their work as a form of hane', or "storytelling." At the same time, Webster explores the consequences of shifting from oral to written media and from Navajo to English as communicative code. "Code switching," for Webster, performs "the tensions between what can be transferred across languages and what cannot" (p. 48). Chapter 2 discusses sound symbolism and ideophony as a means of creating a sense of place, of interpersonal connection, and of Navajoness, both in the sense of creating community and in the sense of standing in resistance to the rationalized approaches to language and literature taught, for example, in English classes at Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding schools. In chapter 3, Webster explores some ideological dimensions of language choice among Navajo speakers and

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 30, 2011

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