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Embedded Counterpublics: Women and Islamic Revival in Morocco

Embedded Counterpublics: Women and Islamic Revival in Morocco Embedded Counterpublics Women and Islamic Revival in Morocco Zakia Salime In 2002 the Moroccan Parliament experienced an unprecedented event. Women won thirty-five seats, representing 10 percent of the total seats. Six of those seats occupied by women were representing the Party of Justice and Development (al-Adala w-al-Tanmia), the newly authorized Islamist party. In the public mind the presence of veiled women in the Parliament carried significant weight, as the press then began to grapple with the importance of gender. On the one hand, this had bearing on "state liberalization."1 On the other was the fight against "terror."2 But even prior to the 2002 elections, women were already active participants in the Islamic revival movement--seeking a more important role for the Sharia in everyday life--and were already at the center of political debates about the state's reform of the religious field, to which several ministerial decisions bear witness. For instance, in the year 2000 the Ministry of Endowment and Islamic Affairs endorsed women's demands to be awarded space and time for their lectures in mosques. According to Fatema Najjar, a high school teacher and a renowned wa'ida (preacher), one hundred women were officially appointed to mosques in the city http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Embedded Counterpublics: Women and Islamic Revival in Morocco

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 37 (3) – Oct 22, 2016

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

Embedded Counterpublics Women and Islamic Revival in Morocco Zakia Salime In 2002 the Moroccan Parliament experienced an unprecedented event. Women won thirty-five seats, representing 10 percent of the total seats. Six of those seats occupied by women were representing the Party of Justice and Development (al-Adala w-al-Tanmia), the newly authorized Islamist party. In the public mind the presence of veiled women in the Parliament carried significant weight, as the press then began to grapple with the importance of gender. On the one hand, this had bearing on "state liberalization."1 On the other was the fight against "terror."2 But even prior to the 2002 elections, women were already active participants in the Islamic revival movement--seeking a more important role for the Sharia in everyday life--and were already at the center of political debates about the state's reform of the religious field, to which several ministerial decisions bear witness. For instance, in the year 2000 the Ministry of Endowment and Islamic Affairs endorsed women's demands to be awarded space and time for their lectures in mosques. According to Fatema Najjar, a high school teacher and a renowned wa'ida (preacher), one hundred women were officially appointed to mosques in the city

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 22, 2016

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