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Elizabeth Fries Lummis Ellet (1818-1877)

Elizabeth Fries Lummis Ellet (1818-1877) LEG ACY PROFILE carol mattingly University of Louisville More than a century-and-a-half ago, Elizabeth F. Ellet began the process that scholars continue today of recovering and recording the lives and contributions of women. One of the best-known writers of her day, Ellet published prolifically in a wide variety of genres. In part because she refused to follow expected roles for women, she became embroiled in public battles with prominent literary men, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Rufus W. Griswold. Consequently, despite her pioneering work as a precursor of feminist scholarship, Ellet has been cited by twentieth-century literary critics primarily in negative terms. However, Ellet was a major participant in the nineteenth-century literary scene and continues to be acknowledged by historians for her valuable early methodology in recovering women's history. Elizabeth Fries Lummis was born in Sodus Point, New York, in October 1818 to a well-todo physician, William Nixon Lummis, and Sarah Maxwell Lummis.1 Educated at a female seminary at Aurora, New York, Ellet began writing poetry in her early teens. Her first book, published when she was sixteen and entitled Poems, Translated and Original (1835), collected her own poems, many previously published, with some she had translated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy uni_neb

Elizabeth Fries Lummis Ellet (1818-1877)

Legacy , Volume 18 (1) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 The University of Nebraska.
ISSN
1534-0643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LEG ACY PROFILE carol mattingly University of Louisville More than a century-and-a-half ago, Elizabeth F. Ellet began the process that scholars continue today of recovering and recording the lives and contributions of women. One of the best-known writers of her day, Ellet published prolifically in a wide variety of genres. In part because she refused to follow expected roles for women, she became embroiled in public battles with prominent literary men, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Rufus W. Griswold. Consequently, despite her pioneering work as a precursor of feminist scholarship, Ellet has been cited by twentieth-century literary critics primarily in negative terms. However, Ellet was a major participant in the nineteenth-century literary scene and continues to be acknowledged by historians for her valuable early methodology in recovering women's history. Elizabeth Fries Lummis was born in Sodus Point, New York, in October 1818 to a well-todo physician, William Nixon Lummis, and Sarah Maxwell Lummis.1 Educated at a female seminary at Aurora, New York, Ellet began writing poetry in her early teens. Her first book, published when she was sixteen and entitled Poems, Translated and Original (1835), collected her own poems, many previously published, with some she had translated

Journal

Legacyuni_neb

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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